The Daily Editors' Blog

ICD-10 is around the corner, for real this time

ICD-10 is around the corner, for real this time

There's a looming massive report on all the hospital readmissions data in your area and the strategic plan your facility needs to pursue. It involves talking to lots of employees, gathering data, doing statistics and the actual writing, not to mention proofreading, and having your boss sign off on it. It's due Oct. 15.

The sweet irony of a nursing home report card

The sweet irony of a nursing home report card

It's said that politics, among other things, makes for strange bedfellows. Add long-term care quality improvement efforts to the list.

Five-star ratings: What a racquet?

Five-star ratings: What a racquet?

The provider community can sound downright oxymoronic when it comes to the five-star rating system for nursing homes.

Is it any mystery why so many beds remain empty?

Is it any mystery why so many beds remain empty?

Ask skilled care or senior living operators about their biggest operational challenge, and the answer is almost always the same: keeping the place full. A new investigation of the way many operators deal with prospects shows that there's a lot of room for improvement.

The Real Nurse Jackie

Why it really is the most wonderful time of the year

Why it really is the most wonderful time of the year

It's back to school time. For most of the world, figuring out childcare just got easier. But it isn't so easy when you have to be at work before school starts, or after it ends AND you're making the money a nursing assistant makes. Here's a possible solution.

If you want it, YOU have to make it happen!

If you want it, YOU have to make it happen!

A recent article on Medline Nursing alleged that the average registered nurse (RN) wants more sleep, authority respect and work-life balance. We can get what we want. We just have to learn to "ask" in the right way. And who should we ask? Well, mostly ourselves.

Guest blogs

The call for action to prevent norovirus

The call for action to prevent norovirus

It all started with a gathering. My family had lost a loved one. Some of us flew, others drove but whatever it took, we came together to celebrate the life of our loved one. Within 48 hours after the service, the texts started flying. Seven of us were ill, feeling like we were going to die. Two of us ended up at the hospital. The two who were seen at the hospital were positive for norovirus. The rest of us knew that we were right there with the others. Norovirus had claimed victory over our bodies.

Stakeholders need to prepare for the loss of long-term care's exemption to e-prescribing

Stakeholders need to prepare for the loss of long-term care's exemption to e-prescribing

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services is set to lift long-term care's exemption from its e-prescribing rule as of Nov. 1. This is bigger news than most realize right now, and there has been no indication CMS is going to postpone things.

Things I Think

Froyo funding for long-term care

Froyo funding for long-term care

I have been blessed with an astute business mind, and am always on the lookout for new pricing models for long-term care. I know we're in this profession for love, not money. But no margin, no mission, as they say. Which is much better than what they used to say — no profit, no point.

The beauty of bad publicity

The beauty of bad publicity

When I saw the New York Times article illuminating the clever ways devious operators could inflate their Medicare star ratings, I had mixed emotions ranging from fury to rage.

Rehab Realities

Long-term care and therapy: It's complicated

Long-term care and therapy: It's complicated

There is an option in Facebook to mark your relationship status as, "It's complicated." This is a great way to sum up everything, without getting too personal. Even though posting your relationship status on Facebook is personal. It's also great way to characterize long-term care therapy.

Dementia or just new batteries needed?

Dementia or just new batteries needed?

Age-related changes are a natural part of everyone's existence. We can all expect to get wrinkles, gray hair, and decreases in our vision and hearing, among many other delightful changes. However, dementia is not one of these age-related changes to be taken as a "given."

Featured Articles