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Top Medicaid fraud convicts are nursing and home health aides, OIG says

Top Medicaid fraud convicts are nursing and home health aides, OIG says

Nearly one-third of Medicaid fraud criminal convictions the federal government obtained last year involved home health aides, a government report finds. Thirty percent of the 2014 cases involved home health aides, while certified nursing aides were culprits in 9% of convictions.

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Better provider policies needed in wake of historic Alzheimer's sex case, experts say

A 78-year-old retired lawmaker on Wednesday was found not guilty of sexual abuse of his Alzheimer's-afflicted wife. The Iowa case attracted nationwide attention and has been watched closely by many long-term care professionals.

Online forum will explain new home health rating system

A special one-hour, web-based open door forum will be held May 7 to explain to providers the new set of star ratings for the Home Health Compare website, the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services announced.

Also in the News for Friday, April 24

Convicted nursing home killer says evidence destroyed .... Rhode Island zeroing in on Medicaid reimbursements ... AHCA lends support for Veterans Access bill ... Assisted living caregiver charged with raping resident

Quote of the Day

Just so we're clear, I do not have a problem with the disabled having access to attendant programs.

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Gratitude and good cheer, Part 2

Gratitude and good cheer, Part 2

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"What is your favorite place in the building where you work, and why?" 

Send your answer to Senior Editor Elizabeth Newman at elizabeth.newman@mcknights.com. Please include your name, title, name of your workplace and its location. When possible, please include a picture of yourself. Your answer may appear in McKnight's Long-Term Care News.

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Preserving Cognitive Status in Elderly Surgical Patients Requiring General Anesthesia

Preserving Cognitive Status in Elderly Surgical Patients Requiring General Anesthesia

The elderly brain is more vulnerable to the adverse effects of surgery and anesthesia compared with the younger brain. Both anecdotally and in clinical investigation, the elderly surgical population has been found to exhibit a significantly higher prevalence of postoperative cognitive decline. The most common manifestations of this decline are postoperative delirium (POD) and postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD).

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