Top News Story

SNFs pay $3.8 million to settle false claims and overmedication charges

SNFs pay $3.8 million to settle false claims and overmedication charges

The owners of two California nursing homes have agreed to pay $3.8 million to the federal government.

More News

Popular Alzheimer's drug to remain on the market at least until August

A federal appeals court has temporarily thwarted a drug company's plan to replace a proven Alzheimer's drug with a more expensive version.

New CMS Medicaid managed care rule introduced

An ambitious and comprehensive policy-making effort that promises to completely transform and radically overhaul the Medicaid managed care marketplace has passed White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) review.

Heightened painkiller-abuse attention snares provider interest

Heightened calls to curb painkiller-related hospitalizations and deaths on both sides of the aisle in Congress and the presidential campaign trail may make providers concerned about more restrictions on medications in long-term care.

Quote of the Day

"I'm still a believer in investment in activities that keep seniors' minds engaged, but there is more to discover in the best ways to do that."

Blog round up

Things I Think Toss me overboard

Toss me overboard

Guest columns Talking about and speaking up for nurses

Talking about and speaking up for nurses

Guest columns The pressure is on, Part 1

The pressure is on, Part 1

Guest columns Creating a 'Just Culture'

Creating a 'Just Culture'

Marketplace Experts

Falls conference focuses on prevention

Falls conference focuses on prevention

Editor's Picks

Question of the Month:

"What long-term care figure, living or dead, would you like to meet, and why?"

Send your answer to Senior Editor Elizabeth Newman at elizabeth.newman@mcknights.com. Please include your name, title, name of your workplace and its location. When possible, please include a picture of yourself. Your answer may appear in McKnight's Long-Term Care News.

Featured CE

Preserving Cognitive Status in Elderly Surgical Patients Requiring General Anesthesia

Preserving Cognitive Status in Elderly Surgical Patients Requiring General Anesthesia

The elderly brain is more vulnerable to the adverse effects of surgery and anesthesia compared with the younger brain. Both anecdotally and in clinical investigation, the elderly surgical population has been found to exhibit a significantly higher prevalence of postoperative cognitive decline. The most common manifestations of this decline are postoperative delirium (POD) and postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD).

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