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'Minor' issues at the nursing home can cause disastrous care transitions, expert warns

'Minor' issues at the nursing home can cause disastrous care transitions, expert warns

What may appear to be minor administrative problems in a nursing home - a fax machine locked away at night or no one designated to copy paperwork - can cause major headaches in care transitions, a geriatrician warned in a webinar Thursday. "The most minute things can ruin a good transition," said James Lett II, M.D., a geriatrician and past president of the American Medical Directors Association - The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine.

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Long-term care facilities approach 80% worker flu vaccination rate after handing power to regional pharmacy, AHQR reports

Fourteen long-term care facilities in Pennsylvania dramatically increased their staff flu vaccination rate by having a regional pharmacy take over the process, according to a report issued Thursday by the Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research (AHQR).

RACs were 'most improved' healthcare auditors for getting back money in 2013, government report states

Medicare Recovery Audit Contractors dramatically stepped up their overpayment recoveries last year, returning nearly $487 million more to the government than they did in 2012, according to a new report from a federal watchdog agency.

Septicemia, urinary tract infections rank high on latest list of hospital readmissions causes

Septicemia, urinary tract infections rank high on latest list of hospital readmissions causes

Two infectious conditions common in long-term care settings — septicemia and urinary tract infections — were among the top causes of hospital readmissions for Medicare beneficiaries in 2011, according to recently released data.

Quote of the Day

With all due respect to ... esteemed panels, the problem with long-term care is not that hard to describe.


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Updates on the Diagnosis and Management of Alzheimer's Disease: Screening, Imaging, and Emerging Treatment Strategies

Updates on the Diagnosis and Management of Alzheimer's Disease: Screening, Imaging, and Emerging Treatment Strategies

Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia, affecting approximately 6% to 7% of the population over 65 years of age. The multifactorial etiology of Alzheimer's disease involves complex interplay among genetic, biochemical, and physiologic factors, which manifest clinically as a range of progressive cognitive, affective, and behavioral symptoms. Despite its prevalence and significant associated medical, psychosocial, and economic burden, Alzheimer's disease often remains undiagnosed and untreated. In particular, studies have shown that rates of diagnosis in primary care are well below epidemiologic estimates. Primary care providers (PCPs) may incorrectly believe that diagnosing dementia early is not important, and instead may feel that it can be harmful to patients and their families.

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