Top News Story

Hospitals slap the government with lawsuits over 'two-midnight' policy to reduce observation stays

Hospitals slap the government with lawsuits over 'two-midnight' policy to reduce observation stays

The American Hospital Association and other hospital groups have sued the federal government over the so-called "two-midnight rule," which was designed in part to ease access to skilled nursing services. The rule undermines the judgments of physicians and other clinicians, the hospital associations stated in their complaint, filed Monday in U.S. District Court.

More News

Government would pay seniors to create advanced directives under Senate bill

Medicare beneficiaries would be paid to create advance directives and store them in an easy-access system if a recently proposed Senate bill were to become law.

MS patients less tense and pessimistic in nursing homes than at home, study finds

Nursing home residents with severe multiple sclerosis report being less tense and pessimistic than similar individuals receiving care at home, according to recently published research findings.

Long-term care providers achieved 15% antipsychotic reduction goal, CMS announces

Long-term care providers achieved 15% antipsychotic reduction goal, CMS announces

Long-term care facilities have reduced antipsychotic medication use by more than 15% through a large-scale initiative, according to a new report from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. That means it's time to set a more ambitious goal, a subgroup says.

Quote of the Day

When person-centered care bumps against regulatory barriers, we persevere.


Question of the Month

How do you stay healthy?

Send your answer to Staff Writer Tim Mullaney at tim.mullaney@mcknights.com. Please include your name, title, name of your workplace and its location. When possible, please include a picture of yourself. Your answer may appear in McKnight's Long-Term Care News.

Submit your answer now»

Featured CE

Updates on the Diagnosis and Management of Alzheimer's Disease: Screening, Imaging, and Emerging Treatment Strategies

Updates on the Diagnosis and Management of Alzheimer's Disease: Screening, Imaging, and Emerging Treatment Strategies

Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia, affecting approximately 6% to 7% of the population over 65 years of age. The multifactorial etiology of Alzheimer's disease involves complex interplay among genetic, biochemical, and physiologic factors, which manifest clinically as a range of progressive cognitive, affective, and behavioral symptoms. Despite its prevalence and significant associated medical, psychosocial, and economic burden, Alzheimer's disease often remains undiagnosed and untreated. In particular, studies have shown that rates of diagnosis in primary care are well below epidemiologic estimates. Primary care providers (PCPs) may incorrectly believe that diagnosing dementia early is not important, and instead may feel that it can be harmful to patients and their families.

Don't miss any McKnight's news

Featured Articles