November 2018 - McKnight's Long Term Care News

Print Issue: November 2018

November 2018 LTCN, Page 36, Feature 1, Finance, Don't Bank on Tsunami

Potential residents will be plentiful for long-term operators in the very near future, but will service offerings be up to the task?

Demographic analysis clearly shows long-term care will have a substantially larger number of potential residents within the next five to seven years. Some long-term care leaders have predicted as a matter of course that  the large incoming wave between 2020 and 2023 will more than offset any declines in census and allow the industry a…

Medication Update: November 2018

The FDA has approved a new drug for people exposed to measles and hepatitis A viruses. Drugmaker Grifols said GamaSTAN immune globulin is 80% to 90% effective in preventing hepatitis A infection when administered within two weeks of exposure. Oxford researchers have advanced the feasibility of a universal flu vaccine in Nature Communications. Testing old…

Invesque plans to double staff

Carmel, IN-based real estate investment trust Invesque plans to add nearly 40 more jobs, on top of the 25 it already employs, the company announced in September. The REIT develops skilled nursing and other senior-care facilities, with more than 100 properties in its portfolio, representing 9,000-plus beds, in 19 states and Canada. Invesque went public…

Manager loyalty begets employee loyalty

Low-wage workers such as certified nursing aides and housekeepers are more likely to remain in their jobs if they feel their managers are loyal. So finds a study of turnover at 22 long-term care facilities. Over an 18-month period, 45% of workers surveyed at a chain of skilled nursing, assisted living and hospice providers left…

IT Update: November 2018

» Healthcare data breaches are on the rise. Harvard University researchers analyzed all data breaches reported to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services from January 2010 through December 2017. Published in JAMA, the analysis tallied more than 2,100 breaches, involving a total of 176.4 million patient records. The total number of breaches increased…

The right prescription?

If you want to know what skilled care will look like in five years, consider what hospitals look like today. The first time I heard that adage was in 1990. These days, it rings truer than ever. To be sure, skilled care settings are by no means hospitals. But there’s no denying that nursing facilities…

November 2018 LTCN, Page 8, Wound Care, Thomas Leung

Study finds ‘rare’ instance when age helps wounds heal

A compound whose presence in the bloodstream decreases with age likely helps older people develop fewer scars. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine found that stromal cell-derived-factor-1, or SDF1, influences scar formation and tissue regeneration in mice and lab-grown human skin. In the study, which was published in Cell Reports in…

Monitoring tied to fewer opioids

State prescription drug monitoring programs were associated with up to a 9% reduction in opioid prescriptions at high risk for misuse, an October analysis in Health Affairs found. Cornell Medical College researchers looked at mandates that began between 2011 and 2015 that included legislative actions for drug monitoring. But “results will need updates in the…

November 2018 LTCN, Page 6, Resident Care, Lee A Jennings M.D.

Residents’ own goal-setting effective for Alzheimer’s care

Maintaining physical safety and mental stimulation, receiving medical care related to dementia, avoiding hospitalization and remaining physically active were among the goals set by those with dementia in a recent study. Participants in the UCLA Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care program focused on “goal attainment scaling,” researchers said. In the study, dementia care managers worked with…

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