Research

Hungry for a breakthrough

Hungry for a breakthrough

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Study findings that are applicable to people's daily lives, like sleep and exercise, are good. Incorporating emotions or heart, as I've written about previously, works too. But the best way to grab the public's interest is through their stomachs.

Preparedness is key

Preparedness is key

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There are numerous resources available on the Internet to help you choose the right nursing home for an ailing parent or loved one.

Researchers testing C. diff vaccine in widespread trial

Researchers testing C. diff vaccine in widespread trial

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An international trial is examining the efficacy of a vaccine for C. difficile, the gut-destroying bacterium that is particularly dangerous to seniors.

Study to examine Medicaid-centric nursing homes that excel

Study to examine Medicaid-centric nursing homes that excel

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Evidence-based reasons for why some nursing homes serving Medicaid-heavy populations outperform others will soon be available.

Self-absorption training for seniors sorely needed

Self-absorption training for seniors sorely needed

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Social media overlords have their sights set on enslaving the planet's seniors. They might be in for a surprise.

Shedding light on the impact of hospice care

Shedding light on the impact of hospice care

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While there seems to be some disagreement over Malcolm Gladwell's posit that doing something for 10,000 hours will make you a master at it, the idea that practice leads at least to improvement has received another shot in the arm. (That would be hospice providers you hear cheering in the background.)

Stress helps wound care — at least if you're a mouse

Stress helps wound care — at least if you're a mouse

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Lost in all the recent hubbub about the Ebola virus, Justin Bieber going to anger management class and a guy eating a nursing home resident's pain patch, is breaking news from the exciting world of stress, mice, science and skin.

The big gap in your nursing home

The big gap in your nursing home

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There's a tremendous lack of evidence-based research practices in nursing homes and much of what happens every day is based on belief rather than fact. We need to embrace research as a way to improve quality standards for long-term care residents.

An Alzheimer's reality check

An Alzheimer's reality check

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Alzheimer's researchers — or the public relations machines breathlessly trumpeting their work — should chill out. I see so much of this type of Alzheimer's news that it's hard to get excited when yet another AD press release comes in. So it was with a reluctant click of the mouse that I opened an Alzheimer's-related report from the New York Academy of Sciences last week. I'm glad that I did.

Spare us the false hope about Alzheimer's

Spare us the false hope about Alzheimer's

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Here we go again: This week saw the release of yet another breathless study claiming the cure for Alzheimer's disease is getting closer — maybe.

New skin-healing findings may benefit LTC residents

New skin-healing findings may benefit LTC residents

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French researchers recently identified the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in maintaining skin cells and skin healing in advanced years. The discovery could lead to new innovations in wound care and skin-integrity preservation, they say.

Is the National Football League our best hope for Alzheimer's progress?

Is the National Football League our best hope for Alzheimer's progress?

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More than 110 million Americans watched yesterday's Super Bowl in New Orleans. It's not too hard to see why the game has become our nation's defining cultural ritual. The National Football League also could give us the nation's best chance at progress against Alzheimer's disease.

Long-term care providers: plenty of reasons to look over the shoulder

Long-term care providers: plenty of reasons to look over the shoulder

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As if sobering news weren't in deep enough supply for long-term care providers, we've been reminded again why the threat of getting sued usually lingers in the back of the mind.

Sweet treatment you'll crave: Chocolate helps the heart

Sweet treatment you'll crave: Chocolate helps the heart

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Oh, happy day! Now here is a study that I think pretty much everyone can get behind. Researchers found that dark chocolate (at least 60% cocoa) may be an inexpensive and effective way to help prevent cardiovascular events and reduce your risk for heart disease.

Specializing in diverting primary care

Specializing in diverting primary care

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A recent article in "Research Activities Report," an AHRQ publication, was titled "Primary Care Coordination is More Difficult for Patients Who See Many Specialists." The study "suggested" that a patient's high use of specialists might strain the primary care practitioner's ability to coordinate care. Really?

Results of latest research on technology in the long-term care workplace to be discussed at free McKnight's webcast Tuesday

Long-term care providers next week will learn how they stack up against others in the profession when it comes to technology efforts. That's when McKnight's will hold its fifth free Super Tuesday webcast. New research on providers' technology habits and goals will be revealed and discussed at 3 p.m. (Eastern) Tuesday. Both registration and the accompanying continuing education credit that comes with the session are free.

Changing the conversation: How Americans talk, think and feel about aging

Changing the conversation: How Americans talk, think and feel about aging

In my 25 years as a physician, I've never heard anyone describe themselves as a "functionally impaired patient with chronic multiple conditions," a "long-term care recipient" or a "dual eligible." Yet these types of terms are used every day among healthcare professionals, policy wonks and advocates to describe the very people on whose behalf we work.

Popular diabetes medication linked to heart attack, death

A new study links the popular diabetes drug Avandia with an increased risk of heart attack and death, which could have a considerable effect on public health, according to researchers.

The votes are in: Researchers find mobile polling helps nursing home residents during election season

Mobile polling, in which election officials bring ballots to nursing home residents and assist with voting, is better than current voting methods for individuals in long-term care, according to a new study.

Study: Onset of Alzheimer's preceded by years of rapidly accelerating mental decline

People who develop Alzheimer's disease typically experience up to six years of accelerated mental decline before the disease presents itself, according to new research.

Study: Older adults make more than half of all trips to the emergency room for adverse drug interactions

Adults aged 50 and older made more than 1.1 million trips to the emergency room for adverse drug interactions in 2008, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration report.

Moderate drinking associated with lower risk of dementia

Elderly adults who consume about two alcoholic beverages per day are at a significantly lower risk of developing Alzheimer's disease and dementia than non-drinkers, according to new research from Germany.

Good nursing care and laughter called important for treating hard-to-heal leg ulcers

Advanced technological approaches to treating venous leg ulcers are no match for good quality nursing care and a few good jokes, new research suggests.

Cheer up: Negative view of pain treatment actually affects outcome, researchers find

Whether you perceive the glass as half-full or half-empty could impact the way you react to pain and other medical treatments, according to a new study into the effects of negative thinking.

Alzheimer's experts convene for annual meeting

Top scientists and other experts are meeting Saturday through Thursday at the Alzheimer's Association's International Council on Alzheimer's Disease in Honolulu. The gathering is billed as the world's premiere forum for reporting and discussing groundbreaking research and information on the cause, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders.

Defibrillator implants often overlooked in hospice, end-of-life care

A large percentage of hospices don't account for patients with defibrillator implants, which can lead to unnecessary—and uncomfortable—shocks to patients, new research shows.

Shift long-term care payment responsibility from Medicaid to Medicare, research group suggests

In order to better coordinate care for nursing home residents who are dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid, responsibility for long-term nursing facility services should be shifted from Medicaid to Medicare, suggests a recently released policy brief from policy research group Mathematica.

Purpose and direction in life could stave off Alzheimer's

People who view life with a sense of purpose and who set goals are less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease or dementia, new research indicates.