Psychology

Seeing the 'invisible patient' in LTC

Seeing the 'invisible patient' in LTC

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Jane Gross' recent post 'Seeing the Invisible Patient' in the "New Old Age" blog of the New York Times discusses how professionals often ignore the needs of caregivers of the elderly because they are focused on their identified patient. While the article centers on the burdens of caregivers in the community, it got me thinking about whether we're meeting the needs of families whose loved ones are in long-term care.

10 reasons I'm thankful to work in LTC

10 reasons I'm thankful to work in LTC

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I owe a lot of my blessings to working in long-term care, and my LTC career is a blessing in itself. You might have some of these same feelings.

Stuff I won't do for residents and why your staff shouldn't either: preventing burnout in LTC

Stuff I won't do for residents and why your staff shouldn't either: preventing burnout in LTC

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In my last post, I wrote about some of the many things I do for residents as a long-term care psychologist. The astute reader will note that most of the tasks were accomplished during work hours and within the facility. There's a reason for that.

Instilling hope: Needed for contentment, helpful for long-term care operations

Instilling hope: Needed for contentment, helpful for long-term care operations

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"I hope Santa brings me a Sony DS," my 7-year-old told me the other day. I can tell you right now that Santa is NOT bringing her a video game player, but I didn't want to tell her that. So I did what I imagine most parents would do in that situation: I asked her what else she hoped Santa would bring. What does this have to do with long-term care? As it turns out, a lot.

As a boss, are you providing good guidance, or 'good' stories?

As a boss, are you providing good guidance, or 'good' stories?

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Say what you will about bad bosses: They always seem to create great stories. But not usually as intended.

Inside the mind of an LTC shrink

Inside the mind of an LTC shrink

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I sat in morning report as the nursing supervisor announced the arrival of a new resident. An 80-year old woman was taken to the hospital after a fall at home, where she received a below-knee amputation and contracted C. diff before being transferred to our facility. I looked around the room and speculated about what each of my team members were thinking, imagining thought bubbles over their heads.

After natural disasters: coping with resident and staff emotions

After natural disasters: coping with resident and staff emotions

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The Northeast just experienced an earthquake and a hurricane all in one week. The storm may have subsided, but it's likely residents and staff will still be facing a whirlwind of emotions. And it's likely that, sooner or later, you will have to deal with a natural disaster or other calamity. Here are some tips on how to handle such situations.

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