Johns Hopkins

'2-midnight rule' is increasing observation stays, not decreasing them as hoped, Johns Hopkins director tells Congressional panel

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A Medicare policy change meant to reduce the number of hospital observation stays actually is having the opposite effect, a senior Johns Hopkins Medical System executive told a Congressional panel this week.

Wound care research is poor  and has few answers: review

Wound care research is poor and has few answers: review

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Research on wound care therapy tends to be poor and reveals few insights for new treatment options, according to Johns Hopkins researchers.

Drugs reduce dementia risk

Drugs reduce dementia risk

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Seniors who take certain blood pressure medications might be at a dramatically reduced risk for developing dementia associated with Alzheimer's disease, according to findings in Neurology.

Insomnia predicts nursing home admission, study finds

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Seniors who have insomnia are more likely to be admitted to a nursing home than those who experience quality sleep, according to a recently published study.

More seniors are hospitalized for respiratory disorders as the outdoor temperature rises, study finds

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Seniors are increasingly likely to be hospitalized for respiratory problems as it becomes warmer, according to a recently released study.

Bedside device accurately determines if extremely dizzy people are having a stroke, researchers find

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A bedside device that measures eye movements could become a standard way of determining if extreme dizziness is being caused by a stroke, researchers say.

Nursing home residents at greatest risk of MRSA in February and March, study finds

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Seniors in nursing homes are at greatest risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in the winter months, while children are at greatest risk during the summer, according to a recently released study.

The Unknown Profession: Geriatrician

The Unknown Profession: Geriatrician

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OK, so I just figured out why geriatricians are the some of lowest paid physicians in the profession. It's because no one knows who the heck they are! We have proof.

New Johns Hopkins process tackles dementia symptoms

New Johns Hopkins process tackles dementia symptoms

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A new six-step approach from Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing professors outlines management of behavioral symptoms in dementia.

Alzheimer's patient receives first-ever brain 'pacemaker'

In an effort that is hoped to boost memory and reverse cognitive decline, surgeons at Johns Hopkins hospital recently placed a pacemaker-like device into the brain of a patient with Alzheimer's disease. The implanted device provides deep brain stimulation via low voltage electrical charges and has been used in patients with Parkinson's disease. The first-of-its-kind operation could lead to a new treatment protocol, according to experts.

Johns Hopkins surgeon implants 1st U.S. brain 'pacemaker' for Alzheimer's disease

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In an effort that is hoped to boost memory and reverse the mental slide of Alzheimer's sufferers, surgeons placed a pacemaker-like device into the brain of a patient in the early stages of the disease. The November operation was the first of its kind in the United States.

Study: Low-dose antipsychotics and regular mental health visits extend life expectancy of schizophrenics

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People with schizophrenia are likely to live a significantly longer life if they take lower levels of antipsychotic drugs and see a mental health professional, Johns Hopkins researchers say.

You're getting sleepy

You're getting sleepy

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Sleep quality, or a lack thereof, will no doubt be familiar to anyone who has children. Even if without progeny, some of you might relate to the following.

Researchers decry 'regressive attitude,' urge more consideration of seniors for kidney transplants

More seniors with kidney disease should be put on transplant lists, according to a Johns Hopkins researcher. Attitudes based on outdated outcomes instead appear to be keeping seniors off transplant lists, he said.

Infection control program among seniors reduces deaths by 10%, could save 'trillions' in waste

Infection control program among seniors reduces deaths by 10%, could save 'trillions' in waste

An infection control program developed by the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine has helped lower death rates in hospital intensive care units by 10%, experts say. A Thompson/Reuters analysis of the program, which could be adapted for other healthcare settings, asserts it could save $3.6 trillion in waste over 10 years if it becomes more widely used.

AHA announces chair of long-term care section

Dr. Michele Bellantoni, the medical director at Johns Hopkins Bayview Care Center, was named the 2011 chair of the American Hospital Association's Long-Term Care and Rehabilitation section.

Young adults with strong language skills at lower risk for Alzheimer's later, research suggests

A study from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore suggests that "20-somethings" with highly developed language skills are less likely to have Alzheimer's disease in old age, even if they develop the hallmark brain tangles that typically lead to dementia.

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