Brain

Building named Sandra Eskenazi Center for Brain Care Innovation

Eskenazi Health and the Health & Hospital Corporation of Marion County (HHC) has named a new building the Sandra Eskenazi Center for Brain Care Innovation.

Lifestyle and the aging brain

Lifestyle and the aging brain

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There's a growing body of evidence that shows that we do have some control over protecting ourselves from signs of dementia and cognitive decline—and even the physical damages of Alzheimer's on the brain—through lifestyle.

Delirium in seniors linked to higher risk of dementia, study finds

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Seniors who have experienced episodes of delirium have a significant risk of developing dementia, new research suggests.

Improving care for cognitively impaired residents the focus of April 24 McKnight's webcast

Improving care for cognitively impaired residents the focus of April 24 McKnight's webcast

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Providers can learn how to better handle one of their most challenging caregiving categories — cognitively impaired residents — by tuning in to a free McKnight's webcast April 24.

Electric brain stimulation improves swallowing dysfunction in stroke patients, study says

Electrical brain stimulation has been shown to help recent stroke patients who have difficulty with swallowing after a stroke, according to researchers at Duke University Medical Center's Stroke Center.

Researchers say aerobic exercise expands and empowers the aging brain

Aerobic exercise can increase the size of the aging brain's hippocampus, the part that houses memory and spatial navigation, researchers report in new study findings.

Brain shrinkage halved by taking B vitamins, Alzheimer's researchers say

In a possible breakthrough in the treatment of seniors with memory problems, British researchers say they have discovered that very large daily doses of B vitamins can cut the rate of brain shrinkage in half. The findings could lead to treatment that would slow the progression of dementia and Alzheimer's disease, they said.

'Cross-talk' in the brain responsible for slowed responses in old age, study says

What we might have here is a failure to communicate: Breakdowns in certain brain connections could be responsible for slowed physical reaction times as we age, new research suggests.