Direct Care

CMS to weigh comments on disqualifying convictions in crafting background check regulations

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Long-term care stakeholders generally support proposed regulations on background checks of direct care workers, according to an informational memorandum issued Friday by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

CMS work group recommends approach for employing former criminals in long-term care settings

CMS work group recommends approach for employing former criminals in long-term care settings

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Long-term care providers and states should agree on what a "direct access employee" is and whether that person has a criminal conviction that should keep him or her from working in a nursing home, according to a a recently released report from the Long-Term Care Criminal Convictions Work Group.

Cooperation needed between organized and non-organized labor to care for boomers

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Organized labor groups will need to collaborate with non-union direct care workers in order for the eldercare workforce to meet the significant needs of an aging population, experts contend.

Alzheimer's care costs could top $200 billion this year

Direct care costs for treating Alzheimer's disease are estimated to be $200 billion in 2012, a new report reveals. Fully $140 will be paid through the Medicare and Medicaid programs. While 800,000 Alzheimer's sufferers live alone, most are being treated in a skilled nursing facility, assisted living, or by a family caregiver, according to "2012 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures" report from the Alzheimer's Association. Private insurance accounts for less than one-quarter of the costs, the report states. Currently, 5.4 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease, and that number is expected to jump 30% by 2025, and triple by 2050.