Congressional Budget Office

Reform's new 'lynchpin'

Reform's new 'lynchpin'

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The long-term care sector is reeling a bit, thanks to two recent developments.

CBO: Federal deficit decreasing, but expected to rise with baby boomer retirement

CBO: Federal deficit decreasing, but expected to rise with baby boomer retirement

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Medicare reimbursements grew modestly in 2014, according to a government report that focused on the decrease in the federal deficit.

CBO analyzes Medicaid caps to curb federal healthcare spending

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The federal government could reduce its Medicaid contributions to states as a deficit reduction measure, but the move likely would achieve savings only by putting seniors at risk, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

What about Social Security for the rest of us?

What about Social Security for the rest of us?

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It's an established fact that Social Security will be kaput by the time we need it, right? Things may not be as bad as many of us have led ourselves to believe.

Why long-term care operators are wary - and weary - of sequestration fiasco

Why long-term care operators are wary - and weary - of sequestration fiasco

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Well, here we go again. Less than three months after President Obama and Congress narrowly avoided walking off a fiscal cliff, we're bracing for Round 2. Only this time, we're all a bit worse for wear.

Election Day: Moment at hand for the future of healthcare funding and coverage

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After more than a year on the campaign trail, it all comes down to Tuesday. Elections across the country, topped by the battle for the presidency, will take place. The results could set in motion the framework for new regulatory and reimbursement processes for long-term care and other providers. Or they could further reforms already begun. Dozens of key U.S. congressional races also will be of interest to providers. Beyond the typical local implications, elected members of Congress will be able to dictate the direction of any national agenda for healthcare and funding reform.

Medicare payment board would slash government payments to SNF providers, paper says

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The Affordable Care Act's controversial Medicare payment board would be an "agent for reimbursement cuts to Medicare," according to a policy paper released Wednesday.

CBO won't have an estimate on Affordable Care Act's deficit impact prior to House repeal vote

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The Congressional Budget Office is still assessing the impact of the Supreme Court's Affordable Care Act decision on the federal deficit and won't have an estimate until the end of July. That figure, when it's calculated, could either help or hurt Congressional Republicans' efforts to repeal the law.

Up to 15 Republican governors say they will not participate in health law's Medicaid expansion

Up to 15 Republican governors say they will not participate in health law's Medicaid expansion

The governors of 15 Republican-leaning states have signaled that they will not participate in the Affordable Care Act's Medicaid expansion, a new analysis finds.

CBO: Healthcare spending could spur federal debt to twice the size of the U.S. economy by 2037

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If the federal debt continues to grow at current rates, it is on track to be almost twice the size of the U.S. economy by 2037, driven largely by entitlement spending on baby boomers, a new analysis projects.

Reports forecast Medicare funding boost, dim overall outlook

Reports forecast Medicare funding boost, dim overall outlook

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The Affordable Care Act will help Medicare save over $200 billion through 2016, according to government actuaries. But questions as to Medicare's long-term solvency remain, another report from Social Security and Medicare Boards of Trustees states.

CBO: Obama budget would achieve Medicare and Medicaid savings by cutting provider payments

CBO: Obama budget would achieve Medicare and Medicaid savings by cutting provider payments

An analysis of President Obama's proposed fiscal 2013 budget found it would lower government spending on Medicare by $276 billion and Medicaid by $66 billion over 10 years.

IPAB repeal to be tied to malpractice legislation

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House Republicans plan to tie the repeal of the Independent Payment Advisory Board to medical malpractice legislation when Congress resumes next week.

CBO: Federal healthcare spending could double by 2022

Federal spending on Medicare and Medicaid is expected to double by 2022, reaching $1.8 trillion or 7% of the entire economy, according to a new Congressional Budget Office report.

Increasing Medicare eligibility age would save money, increase Medicaid spending, budget office says

Increasing the Medicare age to 67 would save the federal government $148 billion between 2012 and 2021, but the savings would be offset by an increase in Medicaid spending, the Congressional Budget Office said Tuesday.

States argue against Medicaid expansion in healthcare reform law challenges

States argue against Medicaid expansion in healthcare reform law challenges

Twenty-six states filed a brief Tuesday encouraging the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down a provision of the healthcare reform law that calls for a major expansion of Medicaid.

Legislation repealing CLASS would have no budgetary impact, CBO says

Legislation repealing CLASS would have no budgetary impact, CBO says

Cancellation of the CLASS Act means there will be billions less going toward reducing the nation's net deficit, the Congressional Budget Office said Monday. The Community Living and Assistance Services and Support (CLASS) program was a part of healthcare reform law, the total of which the CBO estimated would reduce the federal deficit by around $143 billion in a decade. Of that, $81 billion was coming from premium payments for long-term care insurance through CLASS.

Automatic Medicare cuts would save government $123 billion, report says

If the congressional "super committee" fails to reach its deficit reduction goal, automatic Medicare cuts would save the government more than $120 billion over the next decade, according to a report.

CLASS implementation likely delayed by one year

CLASS implementation likely delayed by one year

A Congressional Budget Office update issued Wednesday indicates there will be a one-year delay in the implementation of the Affordable Care Act's long-term care insurance plan.

Feds hint that looming ACO regs could take more expansive approach

Federal officials are hinting that accountable care organization testing models may have a broader scope than previous reports have indicated. The imminent regulations could be out within a week.

Most of the $115 billion in newly reported discretionary spending represents existing healthcare reform spending, CBO clarifies

Most of the $115 billion in newly reported discretionary spending represents existing healthcare reform spending, CBO clarifies

The Congressional Budget Office on Wednesday released clarification of its analysis showing that $115 billion in discretionary spending will result from the healthcare reform law. Most of that spending is for existing programs, according to the CBO.

CBO: Discretionary spending in health reform law could reach $115 billion over a decade

CBO: Discretionary spending in health reform law could reach $115 billion over a decade

Discretionary spending resulting from the recently passed healthcare reform law could total $115 billion over 10 years, according to a new analysis from the Congressional Budget Office. That includes around $100 million for long-term care and elder abuse programs.

The gloves to come off in reform debate

Now that House Democrats, the dominant party in that chamber, have issued their proposal for healthcare reform, the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office will put a price tag on it. The full House then could vote on the measure by the end of next week.

CBO: market-basket freeze for skilled nursing could add up to billions in savings

The federal government can expect to save roughly $26 billion in Medicare costs over 10 years in part by freezing the market-basket update for skilled nursing facilities in fiscal year 2010, according to a new analysis from the Congressional Budget Office.

CBO: Disability insurance program proposal would save $59 billion over 10 years

CBO: Disability insurance program proposal would save $59 billion over 10 years

The Congressional Budget Office has estimated that a legislative proposal for a disability insurance program would save $59 billion between 2010 and 2019. Also, if implemented, this program would lead to savings of $2.5 billion for the Medicaid program over that period, the public analysis agency said late last week.