Whooping cough rates soar; shots urged

Share this article:

Adults over age 65 are being pushed with more emphasis to get the whooping cough (tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis/Tdap) vaccine, which researchers have found to be as safe and effective in the senior population as a traditional tetanus and diphtheria vaccine.

As more adults receive the Tdap shot, an “evaluation of the safety of the vaccine in this population becomes essential,” said Hung Fu Tseng, Ph.D., Kaiser Permanente Southern California Department of Research & Evaluation.

There were 119,573 participants in the study who received the Tdap at one of seven Kaiser Permanente locations between January 2006 and December 2010. The same number received the TD vaccine. The risk for adverse post-vaccination reactions was comparable and minimal between both groups.

More adults are being vaccinated due to the spiking rate of infants contracting whooping cough, experts say. Infants younger than a year have the greatest risk and mortality from the disease, as they cannot be vaccinated until they are 2 months old. 

The findings were published in Clinical Infectious Diseases


Share this article:

More in News

Nursing home antipsychotic use has dipped nearly 19% under national effort, latest figures show

Nursing home antipsychotic use has dipped nearly 19% ...

The percent of long-stay nursing home residents receiving antipsychotic medication has decreased 18.8% under a nationwide initiative that started in 2012, according to the most recent quarterly figures from the ...

Jimmo succeeds in getting Medicare coverage, two years after landmark case ended

Glenda Jimmo has reached a settlement with the federal government and will finally receive Medicare coverage for claims that were denied in 2007, which led her to file a class-action lawsuit over the so-called "improvement standard."

Also in the news for Oct. 31, 2014 . . .

Minnix hopes White House aging conference will spur 'huge shift' ... CMS finalizes home health payment reductions ... Dementia is now No. 1 killer of women in England