WHO issues guidelines on hand hygiene for healthcare workers

Share this article:
The World Health Organization has released a new report, "Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care," which target administrators, public health officials and healthcare workers.  

When it comes to educating healthcare workers on hand hygiene techniques, the focus should be on factors that influence behavior, rather than specific hygiene products, report authors say. It is also important to highlight situations in which patient-care activities can lead to hand contamination, they add.

Among their observations and recommendations for hand hygiene techniques: Rub a palmful of alcohol-based hand-rub over all hand surfaces until dry; use a towel to turn off the tap or faucet, and do not reuse the towel; liquid, bar, leaf, or powdered soap is acceptable; bars should be small and placed in racks that allow drainage; soap and alcohol-based hand-rub should not be used together.

For more information, visit:
http://www.who.int/gpsc/tools/en
http://www.mcknights.com/Guidelines-on-Hand-Hygiene-for-Healthcare-Workers-from-the-World-Health-Organization/article/136404/
Share this article:

More in News

Expert says providers often wrongly threatened by PEPPER reports

Instead of fearing further scrutiny by federal authorities, providers should embrace the opportunity to get feedback in the form of PEPPER reports, legal experts said Monday at the LeadingAge annual meeting in Nashville.

Healthcare reform already driving diverse, dynamic long-term care models, LeadingAge leaders say

Healthcare reform already driving diverse, dynamic long-term care ...

One way to gauge the effects is healthcare reform is by looking at ongoing changes to the continuing care retirement community model, LeadingAge officials said Monday at the association's annual ...

Federal court: Nursing home can be sued for firing hairdresser who can ...

Is the ability to transport residents in their wheelchairs an essential function of a nursing home hairdresser? A federal appeals court says it's a valid question and is allowing a hairdresser to sue a facility that fired her.