Viruses not just for people anymore

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Long-term care providers have always had to worry about microscopic viruses that might attack residents and staff. But it appears that computer viruses could turn out to be a powerfully significant problem as well. As medical equipment is increasingly connected to PCs — especially those running Windows — the devices themselves can be vulnerable to computer viruses, experts caution. In September, the Government Accountability Office issued a report noting that computerized implanted defibrillators and insulin pumps could be especially vulnerable to hacking. The agency also asked the Food  & Drug Administration to address the issue. So far, no related injuries have been reported. But it's clear that malware issues are likely to become more prevalent as technology plays a larger role in eldercare services.

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