Viruses not just for people anymore

Share this article:
Long-term care providers have always had to worry about microscopic viruses that might attack residents and staff. But it appears that computer viruses could turn out to be a powerfully significant problem as well. As medical equipment is increasingly connected to PCs — especially those running Windows — the devices themselves can be vulnerable to computer viruses, experts caution. In September, the Government Accountability Office issued a report noting that computerized implanted defibrillators and insulin pumps could be especially vulnerable to hacking. The agency also asked the Food  & Drug Administration to address the issue. So far, no related injuries have been reported. But it's clear that malware issues are likely to become more prevalent as technology plays a larger role in eldercare services.

Share this article:

More in Products

Nurse technology contest seeks applications

Nurses who want to share the ways technology has led to a better student or patient outcome are invited to enter a contest that touts two $10,000 cash awards.

Accessory for swimming approved for cochlear implants

Accessory for swimming approved for cochlear implants ...

The Food and Drug Administration has approved the Aqua+ accessory, a waterproof, behind-the-ear product for cochlear implant recipients. The accessory allows Cochlear™ Nucleus® 5 and Nucleus 6 Implant recipients2 to ...

Non-Invasive Open Ventilation System approved

Non-Invasive Open Ventilation System approved

Breathe Technologies, which makes the Non-Invasive Open Ventilation (NIOV) System, said the Food and Drug Administration has granted the fifth 510(k) clearance for the product.