Vibration could heal chronic diabetic wounds, researchers find

Share this article:

Diabetic foot ulcers and other chronic wounds might heal more quickly if they are exposed to gentle vibrations, suggests new research from the University of Illinois-Chicago and Stony Brook University in New York.

The investigators designed a mouse study to test whether low-amplitude vibrations improve healing. When wounds received vibrations five times a week for 30 minutes — via the mice being placed on a vibrating plate — they healed more quickly than wounds in a control group, they discovered.

The vibration was linked to the formation of granulation tissue and other pro-healing changes, such as proliferation of molecules called chemokines, the team found.

"The exciting thing about this intervention is how easily it could be translated to people," said UIC's Timothy J. Koh, Ph.D.

Whole body low-intensity vibration can be delivered to humans by a platform that creates uniform vertical oscillations, the researchers stated.

Already, a clinical trial is being planned, and humans are involved in a similar study testing whether vibration can protect against bone loss, Koh said.

Findings appear in PLOS One.

Share this article:

More in News

White House creates new national strategy on antibiotics

White House creates new national strategy on antibiotics

The Obama administration has unveiled a national strategy to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. It includes an executive order to direct the federal government to "reduce the emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant ...

Medicaid provider agreement remains legitimate during bankruptcy proceedings, judge rules

Medicaid must continue to make payments to a Florida nursing home undergoing bankruptcy proceedings, a federal judge rule recently.

Legislator pushes for more HCBS services for Medicaid beneficiaries

Medicaid beneficiaries would have an opportunity to receive more care in a home or community-based setting if a House of Representatives bill passes.