Two more cases of murder-by-insulin alleged at a nursing home

Share this article:
Double homicide at Houston nursing home; victims' roommate arrested
Double homicide at Houston nursing home; victims' roommate arrested

A murderer still at large used insulin shots to kill residents of a skilled nursing facility in Australia, according to authorities. The case is strikingly similar to one in the United States, in which the perpetrator recently confessed.

Two residents of a Summitcare at Wallsend nursing home in Newcastle, New South Wales, died in October after being given insulin shots, according to Australia's ABC News. A third resident also was hospitalized with insulin poisoning.

Police in Newcastle still do not have a suspect in custody, despite conducting hundreds of interviews and examining hundreds of hours of closed-circuit television footage, ABC reported Thursday.

In January, 34-year-old David Satterfield confessed to killing an 86-year-old resident of a Kentucky nursing home in 2007, using insulin. Satterfield, a certified medical technician, was a temporary worker in the facility at the time of his crime.

A second resident at the facility died around the same time and under similar circumstances, but Satterfield did not implicate himself in this death and police have not made a definite connection, a Louisville Metro Police Department spokeswoman told McKnight's in January.

Satterfield confessed because he is dying and homeless, but his motive still is unclear, according to LMPD officials.

Share this article:

More in News

NY nursing home agrees to $2.2 million settlement in case of false documentation

NY nursing home agrees to $2.2 million settlement ...

Nursing home operator Ralex Services Inc. has agreed to a $2.2 million settlement in a whistleblower case involving forged documents at a facility in New Rochelle, New York.

Common soaps could endanger healthcare workers, study finds

Healthcare facilities should consider replacing antibacterial soaps containing the chemical triclosan, University of California-San Francisco researchers assert in a recent Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine article. The conclusion echoes recently updated hand hygiene guidelines.

Mandatory staff hours, better high-acuity care could improve quality of life in ...

A nursing home's staffing patterns and admissions trends are among the most important factors driving residents' quality of life over time, according to recently published research findings.