Traffic noise can increase stroke risk

Share this article:

Exposure to loud traffic noise can increase the risk of stroke in people over the age of 65, according to new study results. Danish researchers found that for every 10 decibels that noise went up, the risk of stroke went up 14%.

This study was conducted in urban areas, which might suggest that nursing homes without adequate sound proofing in busy urban or metropolitan areas, could be putting residents at heightened risk. Prior studies have linked traffic noise with increased risk of heart attack and other cardiac conditions, but this is the first that associates noise and stroke, the researchers said. Elderly people might be more at risk due to fragmented sleep patterns that are common in that age group, investigators hypothesized.

"The mechanisms involved are probably the same mechanisms believed to be involved in noise-induced hypertension and heart attacks, namely that noise acts as a stressor and disturbs sleep, which results in increased blood pressure and heart rate, as well as increased level of stress hormones,” said senior researcher, Dr. Mette Sørensen. “Taken together, all of these could increase the risk for cardiovascular diseases."  The study was published in the Jan. 26 issue of European Heart Journal.

Share this article:
close

Next Article in News

More in News

CMS expands therapy payment research

The government is expanding its research into alternative therapy payments, to consider more holistic changes to the way Medicare reimburses skilled nursing facilities, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services announced Tuesday.

CDC tightens Ebola guidelines for healthcare workers

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued more stringent guidelines for how healthcare workers should interact with Ebola patients, following an outcry from nurses and other professionals.

Nonprofit providers face alarming market forces, must rally, LeadingAge chairman says

Nonprofit providers face alarming market forces, must rally, ...

Nonprofit long-term care providers must work together to address alarming trends, or their market share could plummet and the sector as a whole could falter, LeadingAge Chairman David Gehm told ...