Three nursing unions merge, forming 150,000-member organization

Share this article:
Three major nursing unions have announced they will merge to form one massive union to strengthen their voice in the debate over healthcare reform, according to news reports.

The Massachusetts Nurses Association, the California Nurses Association and United American Nurses made the announcement Wednesday. The new union will contain roughly 150,000 members across the country, and will be affiliated with the AFL-CIO. The group, which will be called the United American Nurses-National Nurses Organizing Committee, will seek to help organize the 85% of RNs who are not in unions, and attempt to pass minimum nurse-to-patient ratio laws, reports the Sacramento Bee.

Meanwhile, the Service Employees International Union, which itself represents more than 1 million healthcare workers, is embroiled in a civil war raging at Unite HERE, a major representative of textile and service workers. SEIU president Andy Stern suggests the quarreling factions resolve their differences by joining the SEIU, a move that would expand SEIU membership to more than 2.5 million, according to Politico.com.

Share this article:

More in News

Hospitals in the Midwest refer patients to the broadest networks of skilled nursing facilities, study finds

Hospitals in the Midwest refer patients to the ...

Midwestern hospitals spread referrals to the greatest variety of skilled nursing facilities and tap their favorite SNFs least often, according to a recently published analysis of nationwide referral patterns.

Bill would affect pay, scheduling for some nursing home housekeeping staff

Nursing homes could face more stringent scheduling requirements for housekeeping workers and might be on the hook to compensate them for last-minute shift changes under a bill proposed in both houses of Congress.

Joint Commission adds memory care accreditation

New memory care accreditation for nursing homes encourages staff to use a flexible, problem-solving approach to care for those with dementia, according to Joint Commission guidelines.