Leveraging the obvious

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Gary Tetz
Gary Tetz

Three things we've learned from long-term care news so far this month. Angry Facebook rants can get you into trouble at work. Republican lawmakers would love to defund Obamacare. And nursing home residents are not satisfied with the food or activities. No word yet on whether gravity contributes to falls or pressure to ulcers, but August isn't quite over yet.

So why do those darn news people keep reporting the obvious? I'm no Rupert P. Murrow, but I think it's because the same dumb stuff keeps happening, and as a society and profession we need to know about that. The lessons available to be drawn or the actions taken from any given news story may be head-slappingly clear, but that doesn't mean anyone's actually listening or, god forbid, changing behavior.

The obvious is news because it so obviously shouldn't be. Ever since the days when newspapers were scrawled on the walls of caves by torchlight, we've remained infinitely curious about how slow-learning and just plain dumb other people continue to be. So when members of society in appalling numbers continue to do or believe things that go against their best interests and even self-preservation, that's something we still need to know so we can effect change. Thus, the news.

Someone still thinks a Facebook tirade, or anything we do or say online, is private? How naive and newsworthy. Republicans still think they should kick the legs out from under an admittedly imperfect attempt at healthcare reform, rather than work to make the second step better? How politically naïve, counterproductive — and newsworthy. Some long-term care providers still don't understand the boomers and their crazy demands, like expecting good food at convenient times and having fun stuff to do? Roll the presses before they have to close their doors. 

News of the obvious proves that what's true and clear to many of us isn't necessarily getting through to the rest, and demands that we act accordingly, aggressively and now.

Things I Think is written by Gary Tetz, who cobbles these pieces together from his secret lair somewhere near the scenic, wine-soaked hamlet of Walla Walla, WA. Since his debut with SNALF.com at the end of a previous century, he has continued to amuse, inform and sometimes befuddle long-term care readers worldwide.

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Things I Think

Things I Think is written by longtime industry columnist Gary Tetz, who resides in Portland, OR. Since his debut with SNALF.com at the end of a previous century, he has continued to amuse, inform and sometimes befuddle long-term care readers worldwide.

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