Proud ... and not apologizing

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When did it become so popular to be “antipatriotic”? Does it make you “hip” nowadays?

On Sunday, May 1, we all heard that Navy SEALs raided Osama bin Laden's walled compound in Pakistan and killed him. Later that day, when I was on a popular social media site, I was shocked to see so many posts from my “friends” supposedly quoting Martin Luther King Jr. : “I mourn the loss of thousands of precious lives, but I will not rejoice in the death of one, not even an enemy.”

As usual, one lemming posts, and the others copy it and post, thinking they are original and cool and blah, blah, blah. 

So first of all, hipsters, MLK Jr., never said that — ever! (That's called an “urban legend,” kids.) The second half of the quote that some of you took the time to cut and paste was correct:

“Returning hate for hate multiplies hate, adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars. Darkness cannot drive out darkness: Only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: Only love can do that.” (“Strength to Love,” 1963)

Now, that's something I can get behind!

Americans were on the streets celebrating, to be sure. But what were we celebrating? The fact that the “face” of terrorism was gone? The fact that the world's most wanted terrorist, whose life mission was planning and directing al-Qaida's plots against my country was no longer a threat? Maybe that we had some bit of closure after 9/11, the worst act of terrorism against our country, in which thousands of innocent lives were lost?

And maybe some were celebrating the demise of one man whose sole purpose seemed to be committed to ending the lives of anyone who did not agree with his politics and religion. Or maybe, just maybe, we're celebrating the fact that we are Americans.

We can celebrate that we live in a country where someone like me can blog and complain about the regulatory process, or go off about litigation or whatever and be allowed to do that.

I make no apologies for celebrating my pride. I am proud to live in a country where I can speak my mind — and you can, too. And even if we disagree, no one will shoot either one of us. I am proud to be in a country where I can complain about the judicial system yet get a fair trial (and not get stoned to death because a man wishes it).

I am proud to be in a country that has regulations to ensure its elders are treated fairly (even though we might argue about the interpretation of those regulations sometimes). I am proud to live in a country where there are so many national task forces (such as the NTOCC, where I represent LTC nursing) that look toward protecting the lives of our frailest population, and improving long-term care in general.

Most of all, I stand up and loudly state, I am proud to be an American and I don't give a darn if that's not hip!

So if you're proud of being who you are, let me hear from you.

Keeping it real,

Nurse Jackie

The Real Nurse Jackie is written by Jacqueline Vance, RNC, CDONA/LTC — a real life long-term care nurse who is also the director of clinical affairs for the American Medical Directors Association. A nationally respected nurse educator and past national LTC Nurse Administrator of the Year, she also is an accomplished stand-up comedienne. She has not starred in her own national television series — yet.

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The Real Nurse Jackie

The Real Nurse Jackie is written by Jacqueline Vance, RNC, CDONA/LTC, a 2012 APEX Award of Excellence winner for Blog Writing. Vance is a real life long-term care nurse. A nationally respected nurse educator and past national LTC Nurse Administrator of the Year, she also is an accomplished stand-up comedienne. The opinions supplied here are her own and do not necessarily reflect those of her employer or her professional affiliates.

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