Technology will play a larger role in preventing rehospitalizations, expert says

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CAST Executive Director Majd Alwan
CAST Executive Director Majd Alwan
Providers, especially nonprofits, are willing to invest more than ever before in technology, a leading technical expert said at the LeadingAge convention.

Automation and electronic health records allow healthcare providers to find data at multiple sites and coordinate care, said Majd Alwan, the executive director for CAST and LeadingAge senior vice president of technology, during an interview with McKnight's Editorial Director John O'Connor.

“We're seeing more and more technology vendors implementing interoperability and pursing certification for long-term and post-acute EHRs. We're also seeing some of the members starting to think about advanced features,” Alwan said.

Medication reconciliation and the management of chronic conditions are among ways technology can help keep residents from re-entering a hospital, he noted.

“The biggest opportunity for us right now is partnership for our members with hospitals, especially around hospital readmission reduction initiatives,” Alwan said.

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