Survey: Nurses are 'dangerously' stressed due to lack of authority, poor management

Share this article:

A lack of necessary authority and struggles with management are among multiple factors contributing to nurses' high levels of stress, according to recently released survey results. 

Out of more than 3,300 respondents, 75% reported that they do not have the desired level of authority to do their job well. About half said they “sometimes” have the needed authority. The survey was administered in May by the Vicki Milazzo Institute, which trains legal nurse consultants.

Nearly 90% of respondents said apathetic superiors and inadequate support staff hamper them. Lack of concern, favoritism, lack of current clinical information, poor communication skills and unrealistic expectations were among the management issues described by participating nurses.

Poor eating and sleeping habits linked to long shifts and struggles to maintain work-life balance also are common challenges nurses face, based on the survey results.

The upshot is that nurses are under a great deal of stress — “sometimes dangerously so,” according to a summary of the findings. Reducing nurse stress should be a “national priority,” the Vicki Milazzo Institute declared. It recommended reevaluating work hours, providing nurses access to more nutritious foods, and bringing nurses to the table with management more often.

Click here to access the complete report.

Share this article:

More in News

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in two years: Avalere

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in ...

More than three-quarters of Medicaid beneficiaries will be enrolled in a managed care plan as of 2016, according to an Avalere Health analysis released Thursday. The numbers reveal that managed ...

Nursing home asked for employee's personal information too often, jury rules

The human resources department of a Maine nursing home did not properly protect a former employee's personal identification information, a jury recently ruled.

Test could confirm sepsis within an hour

Nursing home residents might benefit from a new way of diagnosing and treating sepsis made possible by discoveries out of the University of British Columbia.