Survey: Hourly RN rate increases slow at CCRCs in 2009

Share this article:
New code seeks to prevent unethical treatment of foreign-educated nurses
New code seeks to prevent unethical treatment of foreign-educated nurses
Registered nurses (RNs) working at continuing care retirement communities received a lower-than-expected increase in their hourly rates this year. That is according to the soon-to-be-released CCRC Salary & Benefits report from the Hospital & Healthcare Compensation Service (HHCS).

In 2008, participants in the annual survey expected to provide a 3.43% raise to RNs in 2009. In actuality, however, this year's national average hourly increase for RNs at CCRCs was only 2.31%. Also on the decline in 2009 is the average length of time to fill an RN position. The average of 32.13 days in 2008 fell by nearly 24 hours to 31.26 days in 2009, according to the HHSC survey. Many recent reports have indicated that the economic crisis has alleviated—albeit temporarily—the nursing shortage, which could contribute to the shorter fill time.

The annual HHSC report samples responses from more than 73,000 employees at 513 facilities nationwide, and covers roughly 82 different specific professions. The full report will be available at the end of June. A similar survey of nursing homes will be released in July.
Share this article:

More in News

CMS needs to get nursing home staffing information directly from payroll systems, Congressional leaders say

CMS needs to get nursing home staffing information ...

Federal regulators should start collecting nursing home staffing information directly from payroll systems as soon as possible, members of the Congressional Seniors Task Force said in a letter to a ...

Male CNA who wears women's clothing can pursue charges that nursing home ...

A Texas certified nursing assistant can continue to pursue charges that his former nursing home employer has made false, defamatory statements about him in the job referral process, a federal court recently ruled.

High-profile consumer advocacy group sues over broken Medicare appeals process

Long-term care providers have been outspoken in their criticism of the Medicare appeals process, which has all but ground to a halt. Now a class-action lawsuit says Medicare beneficiaries also are being harmed by the excessively long delays.