Survey: DON, administrator salaries jump in 2005

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Median salary levels of directors of nursing rose 7.07% while administrators enjoyed a 5.08% spike this year, according to a new nationwide survey of nursing home workers.

The median salary for DONs is $66,917 and for administrators $76,545, according to the "AAHSA Nursing Home Salary & Benefits Report 2005-2006," which is published by Hospital & Healthcare Compensation Service in cooperation with the country's two major nursing home associations.

Assistant administrators (7.43%, up to $58,633), MDS coordinator (6.38%, up to $47,870), controller (6.15%, up to $62,100) and compliance officer (6.03%, up to $63,540) were the other titles gaining more than 6%. The median raise for all 36 salaried titles surveyed was 3.7%.

Charge staff nurses (RN) (8.49%, up to $23.50) and registered staff nurses (RN)(%5.42, up to $23.52) were among the biggest gainers for hourly wage earners. Therapists also saw large rises overall: physical therapists (8.85%, up to $31.87), respiratory/speech therapist ($9.46, up to $22.22) and speech therapists (8.77%, up to $31.00). The median rise for 38 hourly titles was 4.86%.

More than 2,300 nursing homes (17%) responded to the 28th annual survey.

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