Survey: Average long-term care nurse leader salary reaches $73,000

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Nurse leaders working in long-term care settings will earn an average yearly salary of $73,200 in 2013, according to a recent survey by Nursing Management magazine.

The survey included more than 1,000 people, the magazine reported this month. About two-thirds of respondents said they work in a hospital environment. More than 30% of respondents were nurse managers, followed by directors, educators and supervisors.

Salaries have risen since the 2010 survey, which found long-term care nurse leaders earning $67,500 on average.

Nurse leaders in subacute and rehabilitation care have seen their salaries increase dramatically. Subacute nurse leaders earned an average of $71,200 in 2010, and now are earning $89,500 on average. In rehabilitation care, those numbers were $66,000 in 2010 and $80,000 this year.

Across all settings, the average nurse leader salary for 2013 is $83,300 for females and $89,900 for males, according to survey data.

While salaries have increased on average, many respondents said ongoing fiscal pressures are still limiting performance-based raises and bonuses, Nursing Management reported. 

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