Survey assesses turnover and retention rates among assisted living workers

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The overall retention rate for all assisted living employees was 73% in 2011, a new survey from a provider group finds.

The average turnover rate for all AL workers was 25%, with the highest rates being in food services (26%) and nursing staff (29%), according to a survey conducted by the National Center for Assisted Living, LeadingAge, the Assisted Living Federation of America and the American Seniors Housing Association .The nursing positions with the highest turnover rates were non-certified resident caregivers (44%), certified nurse assistants (26%), and director of nursing/residential services (22%), according to the survey.

NCAL surveyed 370 assisted living centers across the United States for its 2011 Assisted Living Staff Vacancy, Retention and Turnover Survey. The survey focused on five job categories and 16 job positions, and measured job vacancy rates, turnover rates and retention rates.

A separate survey conducted by My InnerView and the National Research Corporation studied employee satisfaction in nursing homes and assisted living facilities.

It reported that assisted living workers expressed more dissatisfaction than nursing home workers in areas such as “comparison of pay (9% satisfied),” assistance with job stress (15% satisfied), and support from supervisors (35%).

Residents gave their providers much better marks. About 88% of nursing home residents and their families rated their care as “good” or “excellent,” while more than 90% assisted living residents rated their care this way, according to the analysis.

Click here to read a summary of the worker satisfaction analysis.

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