Supreme Court rejects Medicaid expansion provisions in health law

Share this article:
U.S. Supreme Court Justices
U.S. Supreme Court Justices

In a landmark decision, the Supreme Court rejected Medicaid expansion provisions in the new healthcare law. However, the court ruled that an individual mandate to purchase health insurance is constitutional.

For long-term care providers, the ruling is likely to have both dramatic and tertiary effects. In its Medicaid verdict, the court ruled that Congress overstepped its authority when it said states must provide expanded coverage to about 17 million more people over the next decade.

This new announcement would appear to be a mixed blessing for long-term care operators. The law would have added millions of non-frail, non-elderly seniors to Medicaid's rolls. This rejection means that skilled care providers will likely have to compete with fewer other healthcare providers for Medicaid funding. The Supreme Court's decision will likely redefine the limits of Congress' power.

Today's ruling will almost certainly also influence the presidential contest between President Obama and Mitt Romney, the likely Republican candidate.

President Obama is expected to address the nation about the ruling later today.

For continuing coverage, visit www.mcknights.com.
Share this article:

More in News

Double homicide at Houston nursing home; victims' roommate arrested

Double homicide at Houston nursing home; victims' roommate ...

A double murder occurred late Tuesday night in a Houston nursing home room shared by four men, according to local authorities. Police arrested Guillermo Correa on suspicion of beating two ...

$2 million HIPAA settlement highlights mobile device risks facing healthcare providers

Laptops and other mobile devices containing personal health information have been stolen from long-term care ombudsman programs and other healthcare organizations, including from Concentra Health Services and QCA Health Plan Inc. Now, Concentra and QCA have agreed to legal settlements totaling nearly $2 million, federal ...

Long-term care nurses often 'scramble' to get family members' blessing for palliative ...

Nursing home residents might not transition to full palliative care until they are very near death, at which point nurses and family members act in a state of crisis, suggests recently published research out of Canada.