Supervisor sentenced to 10 years in prison for role in Medicare, Medicaid fraud scheme

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A former healthcare provider supervisor was sentenced to 10 years in prison Monday for conspiracy to commit healthcare fraud totaling $63 million.

Wondera Eason, of Miami, worked at the now-defunct Health Care Solution Network Inc., where she and the company's owners coordinated a Medicare and Medicaid fraud scheme that resulted in more than $63 million in improper claims.

As the director of medical records at HCSN's partial hospitalization program, she served a vital role in the scheme by overseeing the creation, alteration and forgery of thousands of documents in support of fraudulent claims, authorities said. She also forged signatures of therapists and others on documents and interacted with Medicare and Medicaid auditors to certify the legitimacy of the documents, according to a government press release.

In addition to her prison sentence, Eason was sentenced to serve three years of supervised release and ordered to pay just under $15 million in restitution. Overall, 15 defendants have been charged and have pleaded guilty or been convicted by a jury for their roles in the scheme.

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