Study: The longer a nursing home DON stays, the lower the staff turnover

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Staff turnover is lower at nursing homes with stable nursing leadership, according to a Duke University School of Nursing study.

Researchers surveyed the staff -- nursing home administrators, directors of nursing, registered nurses, licensed practical nurses and certified nursing assistants -- from 164 nursing homes in Texas.

The researchers found that for each year the director of nursing remained in her position, RN turnover decreased by 16% and LPN turnover decreased by 11%.

Nursing homes with good communication, a stable, merit-based work environment and adequate staffing have an edge in retaining nurses, according to the study. The researchers also pointed out there's lower turnover at nursing homes where managers give their directors of nursing a chance to learn from mistakes, build a stable nursing staff and create a positive work environment.

The research was funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research and the Trajectories of Aging and Care Center at Duke University Medical Center.

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