Study illustrates why some wounds escape amputation

Share this article:
Study illustrates why some wounds escape amputation
Study illustrates why some wounds escape amputation
Three conditions must be present for a diabetic foot ulcer to heal without amputation, according to new findings of Swedish researchers.

First, the foot ulcer must be superficial in nature. Second, the resident must have normal blood circulation. Finally, it's important that the person has had diabetes for a relatively short time, investigators found. Nearly 2,500 people participated in the study, which is believed to be the largest-ever foot ulcer study.

“People who have had diabetes for a long time often develop poor blood circulation in their legs, which hampers healing,” said Magdalena Annersten Gershater, a registered nurse and researcher at Malmö University in Sweden.

Gershater performed the study to determine factors related to diabetic foot ulcer healing — with and without amputation. About two-thirds of the patients healed without amputation. Decisive factors were those listed above, Gershater noted. Another 9% of the cases were resolved with amputation of toes or the front of the foot, while 8% underwent leg amputation.

“The study shows that deep infections, vascular disease, the location of the sore, male gender and other disease all increase the risk of amputation,” Gershater added.

She said she is hopeful that providers will take a more comprehensive approach to diabetic foot ulcer care.
Share this article:

More in News

Skilled nursing facilities with poor quality ratings do not readmit more patients to hospitals, researchers find

Skilled nursing facilities with poor quality ratings do ...

Low-quality and high-quality skilled nursing facilities readmit about the same proportion of residents to hospitals, suggest research findings recently published in the American Journal of Medical Quality.

Cipro and related antibiotics increase MRSA risk in long-term care facilities, study ...

Long-term care residents on a fluoroquinolone antibiotic such as Cipro are at an increased risk for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, researchers in France have found.

Jonathan Blum, who oversaw long-term care reforms, resigns as head of Medicare

The nation's top Medicare official, Jonathan Blum, is leaving his post next month, news outlets reported Tuesday. Blum became a familiar figure to long-term care providers through Open Door Forum calls and other outreach efforts during his five-year tenure, as he guided implementation of Medicare ...