Study: Diabetes often precedes wounds

Share this article:

Diabetes is the co-morbid condition most strongly associated with the development of pressure ulcers in nursing home residents, according to an analysis of existing research.

Investigator Yuta Kurashige, M.D., Ph.D., identified seven studies that have been done on this topic. The smallest involved 827 residents in the United Kingdom, and the largest involved more than 14,600 in the United States.

Six of the seven studies found that diabetes mellitus is associated with pressure ulcer development, according to Kurashige, of the Hachioji Medical Center at Tokyo Medical University. 

Some of the studies found that Parkinson's disease, hip fracture and peripheral vascular disease also are correlated with pressure ulcer development, but other studies found that these conditions are not associated with PUs, Kurashige found. His findings are published in the International Journal of Clinical Dermatology & Research.

When taking other care settings into account, the correlation between pressure ulcers and diabetes emerged even more clearly. Clinicians should be especially sensitive to the risks presented by diabetic patients, Kurashige wrote.


Share this article:
close

Next Article in News

More in News

Large hepatitis outbreak reaches 47 cases, podiatry company denies ManorCare's charges

The number of people infected in an infamous North Dakota Hepatitis C outbreak has risen, state health officials say.

National Quality Forum supports quality measures in bill to standardize post-acute assessments

National Quality Forum supports quality measures in bill ...

The National Quality Forum has come out in strong support of a proposed standardized quality measures, such as skin integrity, across different types of post-acute care settings. Uniform assessments are ...

CMS changes mind on hospice drugs

The Centers for Medicaid & Medicare Services has revised guidance on authorization of hospice drugs for those under Medicare Advantage and Part D plans, according to a new memo.