States argue against Medicaid expansion in healthcare reform law challenges

Share this article:
The U.S. Supreme Court building
The U.S. Supreme Court building

Twenty-six states filed a brief Tuesday encouraging the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down a provision of the healthcare reform law that calls for a major expansion of Medicaid.

Many court observers were surprised when the court agreed to hear arguments to this part of the law. A provision in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act requires state Medicaid programs to insure all individuals younger than 65 with income of up to 133% of the poverty level or risk losing federal funding.

In the brief, attorney Paul Clement wrote this requirement threatens funding for “the single largest grant-in-aid program in existence — literally billions of dollars each year — if [states] do not capitulate to Congress' steep new demands.” The brief requests that the court apply the coercion doctrine in striking down the requirement.

The Congressional Budget Office predicts that the Medicaid expansion would enroll 16 million new beneficiaries by the end of this decade. Oral arguments for the case are expected to start on March 28.

Share this article:

More in News

MedPAC discusses limiting patients' post-acute options

MedPAC discusses limiting patients' post-acute options

Medicare rules might have to be relaxed to give hospitals more say in where patients go for post-acute care, members of the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission proposed at a recent ...

Nursing home workers told not to touch residents due to Ebola concerns

U.S. nursing home workers who hail from West Africa are being stigmatized as potential Ebola carriers and forbidden from touching residents, according to IRIN, an independent news service launched by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.

Former office manager charged with embezzling half a million dollars from residents

The former business office manager of a Michigan nursing home has been charged with embezzling more than $460,000 from the resident trust fund, the state's attorney general announced last Thursday.