States are actively working to regulate assisted living facilities, report says

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CMS releases new RAI Manual
CMS releases new RAI Manual
States were actively refining and developing new regulations to monitor assisted living facilities during 2011, an annual report finds.

Sixteen states adjusted assisted living regulations, statutes, and policies during 2011, while four of those — Georgia, Nevada, North Carolina, and South Dakota — considered major changes, a new study from the National Center for Assisted Living reports. Six states revised training and education requirements and several others are planning additional major changes for 2012, including Florida.

The report also describes the impact Medicaid payment changes had on assisted living facilities.

The report, which is published every March, provides observations on assisted living regulations across 21 categories, including life safety, physical plant requirements, medication management, and move-in/move-out criteria, training and education.

Click here to download the full report.
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