State slaps FL nursing home with $16,000 fine for resuscitating resident against his wishes

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Authorities in Florida have fined a nursing home $16,000 for reviving a resident with a do-not-resuscitate order, according to news reports.

The event occurred in February at Jacaranda Manor in St. Petersburg, according to The Associated Press. A 75-year-old male resident stopped breathing in the dining room, prompting staff to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use a defibrillator.

A licensed practical nurse who assisted in delivering CPR located the man's do-not-resuscitate order after paramedics had taken him to the hospital, the AP reported. The facility reportedly has retrained its staff since the incident.

The Florida Agency for Healthcare Administration handed down the fine last month, the Tampa Bay Times reported Wednesday.

Records do not state what happened to the resident after he was placed in intensive care at the hospital, according to the Times. The facility had not returned a phone call from McKnight's as of press time.

Jacaranda Manor is a 299-bed, for-profit facility under private ownership, according to Nursing Home Compare.

Nursing home residents often change their mind about CPR after they are admitted, research has found, with many switching to do-not-resuscitate orders.

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