State caregiver matching programs complement CLASS Act, study finds

Share this article:

Caregiver matching programs, which help elderly and disabled individuals manage their own home healthcare, are a good fit with various provisions of the Community Living Assistance Services and Supports (CLASS) Act, according to a new study.

The CLASS Act is a provision in the Affordable Care Act that creates a premium-based voluntary insurance plan that helps people finance long-term care services and supports. CLASS provides funds that can be used for home healthcare or skilled-nursing care.

Researcher Dorie Seavey, Ph.D., director of policy research at PHI, says seniors and disabled individuals prefer hiring their own caregivers rather than relying on home care agencies. But they need better resources to find them, she added. State-developed matching between current workers and those in need could be one of the building blocks to CLASS' success, Seavey says.

The 50-state PHI study found only 16 publicly funded, state-based matching services registries and six regional matching services.

“Creating a more adequate supply of personal care aides to meet demand and to alleviate burdens on family caregivers is extremely important,” Seavey says. “We also need more effective and efficient mechanisms for deploying these aides in millions of consumer homes on a daily basis. And we need to create access to high-quality, supportive resources like training and peer mentoring for both self-directing consumers and independent providers.”
Share this article:
close

Next Article in News

More in News

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in two years: Avalere

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in ...

More than three-quarters of Medicaid beneficiaries will be enrolled in a managed care plan as of 2016, according to an Avalere Health analysis released Thursday. The numbers reveal that managed ...

Nursing home asked for employee's personal information too often, jury rules

The human resources department of a Maine nursing home did not properly protect a former employee's personal identification information, a jury recently ruled.

Test could confirm sepsis within an hour

Nursing home residents might benefit from a new way of diagnosing and treating sepsis made possible by discoveries out of the University of British Columbia.