Staff stability and resident satisfaction are key goals for providers, quality guru says

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Providers should be avidly trying to reduce rehospitalization rates as a measure of quality, according to an American Health Care Association executive.

Rehospitalization rates of residents in skilled nursing homes are a key target of healthcare reform initiatives, such as accountable care organizations. But less time in the hospital is also a way to increase overall resident satisfaction, says David Gifford, M.D., the senior vice president of quality and regulatory affairs at AHCA. Gifford spoke with McKnight's editor Elizabeth Newman at the AHCA convention in Las Vegas last week.

“We also are really encouraging people to work with the quality awards program [which] really helps people address the foundations of quality to make sure they can reduce the re-hospitalizations, improve staff stability and improve resident satisfaction,” Gifford said.

The AHCA/NCAL Quality Awards program offers providers a chance to achieve bronze, silver or gold awards, based on their performance. A list of 2011 recipients can be found here

For more from Gifford, click on the video or read the transcript.

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