Some diabetics can take insulin right before meals, study finds

Share this article:

Individuals with type 2 diabetes can eat immediately after injecting insulin without compromising their blood sugar level, according to a recently published study in the journal Diabetes Care.

Researchers in Germany conducted a test involving two groups of diabetics with a mean age of 66.7. For four weeks, a group of 49 people did not eat until 20 minutes after injecting human insulin. For the next four weeks, they began eating immediately after injection. A group of 51 people performed the test in reverse order, beginning by eating immediately after injection.

Blood tests revealed that eating immediately after injection resulted in a clinically irrelevant average blood sugar level increase of 0.08%. Furthermore, 86.5% of participants said they preferred eating right after taking insulin.

The results suggest that people do not have to observe an interval between injection and food consumption, which could increase adherence to an insulin regimen, researchers said.

Seniors on multiple medications often struggle to incorporate insulin injections into habits developed over a lifetime and can miss doses, according to a study from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Loyola University Maryland.

Share this article:

More in News

NY nursing home agrees to $2.2 million settlement in case of false documentation

NY nursing home agrees to $2.2 million settlement ...

Nursing home operator Ralex Services Inc. has agreed to a $2.2 million settlement in a whistleblower case involving forged documents at a facility in New Rochelle, New York.

Common soaps could endanger healthcare workers, study finds

Healthcare facilities should consider replacing antibacterial soaps containing the chemical triclosan, University of California-San Francisco researchers assert in a recent Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine article. The conclusion echoes recently updated hand hygiene guidelines.

Mandatory staff hours, better high-acuity care could improve quality of life in ...

A nursing home's staffing patterns and admissions trends are among the most important factors driving residents' quality of life over time, according to recently published research findings.