Sleep quality improves with age, study finds

Share this article:
A person's quality of sleep — or perceived of quality of sleep — should improve with age, a new study suggests.

Investigators at the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology originally set out to confirm the long-held belief that difficulty sleeping increases with age. But after conducting randomized telephone surveys of 155,877 adults, they found the reverse to be true.

"Even if sleep among older Americans is actually worse than in younger adults, feelings about it still improve with age," lead author Michael Grandner, Ph.D., said. "Once you factor out things like illness and depression, older people should be reporting better sleep. If they're not, they need to talk to their doctor. They shouldn't just ignore it."

The study was published in the March edition of the journal Sleep.
Share this article:

More in News

A small team of workers responds best in emergencies, expert says

A small team of workers responds best in ...

Long-term care providers should consider a "flat" crisis management approach that relies on a core group of staff members, experts advised Wednesday at the LeadingAge annual conference.

Nursing homes have better pain and catheter management if leaders have more ...

Nursing homes led by administrators and directors of nursing with higher levels of education and certification have better outcomes on some key quality measures, according to recently published findings.

Court green-lights charges that a healthcare network underused observation stays

A whistleblower can continue to pursue charges that a Nevada healthcare network routinely admitted people as hospital inpatients when they should have been placed in observation status, a federal appeals court recently ruled.