Seroquel maker to pay $5.5M in latest settlement related to off-label use of the antipsychotic drug

Share this article:

Drugmaker AstraZeneca recently settled a lawsuit with the state of Kentucky over allegations of improperly marketing its atypical antipsychotic drug Seroquel. Under the settlement, the London-based pharmaceutical company will pay the Bluegrass State $5.5 million.

AstraZeneca improperly marketed the schizophrenia and bipolar disorder drug for off-label uses, including treatment of dementia and Alzheimer's disease, according to the state's attorney general, Jack Conway. As of August 2004, about 15% of Seroquel users in Kentucky were older than 65, but the drug company had not established Seroquel's “safety or effectiveness” for this group, according to the attorney general.

A spokesman for AstraZeneca said the company denies the allegations and settled with Kentucky to avoid a lengthy and expensive legal battle, according to the Bureau of National Affairs.

This is the latest example of AstraZeneca settling a suit related to marketing Seroquel for off-label uses. The company paid out $520 million in a federal settlement in 2010 and $68.5 million in a settlement involving 37 states in 2011.

Seroquel was the antipsychotic drug most often given to nursing home residents as of 2010, according to a recently published study.

Share this article:

More in News

Hospitals in the Midwest refer patients to the broadest networks of skilled nursing facilities, study finds

Hospitals in the Midwest refer patients to the ...

Midwestern hospitals spread referrals to the greatest variety of skilled nursing facilities and tap their favorite SNFs least often, according to a recently published analysis of nationwide referral patterns.

Bill would affect pay, scheduling for some nursing home housekeeping staff

Nursing homes could face more stringent scheduling requirements for housekeeping workers and might be on the hook to compensate them for last-minute shift changes under a bill proposed in both houses of Congress.

Joint Commission adds memory care accreditation

New memory care accreditation for nursing homes encourages staff to use a flexible, problem-solving approach to care for those with dementia, according to Joint Commission guidelines.