Seniors may drop antidepressants because of side effects from other drugs, study finds

Share this article:

Many American seniors begin taking antidepressants while on medications with contraindications, according to a new study. Because of side effects, many then stop taking the antidepressants.

A study conducted by Thompson Reuters, the University of Southern California and drugmaker Sanofi Aventis found that among American seniors who were first-time antidepressant takers, more than half started taking them while on other contraindicated drugs. Due to resulting side effects, one quarter of them discontinued the antidepressant.

The investigators used information from a database of Medicare claims, where they discovered that 39,000 patients started taking antidepressants between 2001 and 2006. More than 25% of these patients were taking antidepressants in addition to other medications that could cause major drug interactions. Thirty-six percent of these patients were prescribed antidepressants while taking other medications that could cause moderate reactions. A total of 45% of seniors who reported side effects refilled their prescriptions, according to the study whose results were published online in The American Journal of General Psychiatry.

Share this article:

More in News

Hospitals slap the government with lawsuits over 'two-midnight' policy to reduce observation stays

Hospitals slap the government with lawsuits over 'two-midnight' ...

The American Hospital Association and other hospital groups have sued the federal government over the so-called "two-midnight rule," which was designed in part to ease access to skilled nursing services. ...

Government would pay seniors to create advanced directives under Senate bill

Medicare beneficiaries would be paid to create advance directives and store them in an easy-access system if a recently proposed Senate bill were to become law.

MS patients less tense and pessimistic in nursing homes than at home, ...

Nursing home residents with severe multiple sclerosis report being less tense and pessimistic than similar individuals receiving care at home, according to recently published research findings.