Senior buy-in: Study says shopping a healthy habit for the elderly

Share this article:

Seniors who engage in shopping every day, or almost every day, stay healthier longer than those who don't get out of their homes as frequently, according to a new study.

In a study recently published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, Taiwanese researchers found that frequent shopping among seniors is associated with low-impact physical activity and helps them feel involved in their communities, HealthDay News reported. Researchers said this finding fits into the “active aging” concept — the idea that staying active via physical, social and economic activity results in healthier aging. Many long-term care providers in this country regularly transport residents to retail venues — in part, to encourage activity.

Researchers analyzed data from 1,850 participants and found that about half never or rarely went shopping, while 22% said they shopped two to four times per week. While the shoppers tended to be younger, the once-a-day shoppers were 27% less likely to die than those who never shopped, even after adjusting for physical and mental impairment. The investigators wrote that shopping is an excellent way to experience leisure time and physical activity, though experts cautioned not to overreach.

“I would not conclude that shopping itself increases longevity. The characteristics of individuals that enable them to shop are associated with greater longevity," S. Jay Olshansky, professor of public health at the University of Illinois, told HealthDay. "Shopping requires that you physically move from one place to another, be able to handle money, make decisions, etc. All of those characteristics ... are linked to health."

Share this article:

More in News

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in two years: Avalere

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in ...

More than three-quarters of Medicaid beneficiaries will be enrolled in a managed care plan as of 2016, according to an Avalere Health analysis released Thursday. The numbers reveal that managed ...

Nursing home asked for employee's personal information too often, jury rules

The human resources department of a Maine nursing home did not properly protect a former employee's personal identification information, a jury recently ruled.

Test could confirm sepsis within an hour

Nursing home residents might benefit from a new way of diagnosing and treating sepsis made possible by discoveries out of the University of British Columbia.