Senate likely to vote today to delay Medicare physician pay cut

Share this article:
Senate likely to vote today to delay Medicare physician pay cut
Senate likely to vote today to delay Medicare physician pay cut

Senators are expected to vote today to approve a temporary extensions bill that delays a 21.2% reduction in Medicare physician pay until the end of the month. It comes the same day that the hold on the Medicare physician payment cut expires.

Senate Democrats Wednesday night cleared a last procedural hurdle and are expected to vote on the package, which includes an extension of unemployment benefits, today. The pay cut was scheduled to take effect April 1 after the Senate neglected to act on an extension bill before its spring recess. CMS placed a hold on all Medicare physician claims for 10 business days in hopes that the Senate would address a physician pay fix before the end of that period. Many senators have balked at the bill's $9.2 billion price tag, since the funds were not offset by spending reductions elsewhere. It is estimated that a permanent fix to the physician pay problem would cost roughly $200 billion over 10 years.

The bill only provides a two-week respite for physicians before the pay cuts return. Another bill currently working its way through Congress, the American Workers, State and Business Relief Act, would delay the physician payment cut until Sept. 30.

Share this article:

More in News

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in two years: Avalere

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in ...

More than three-quarters of Medicaid beneficiaries will be enrolled in a managed care plan as of 2016, according to an Avalere Health analysis released Thursday. The numbers reveal that managed ...

Nursing home asked for employee's personal information too often, jury rules

The human resources department of a Maine nursing home did not properly protect a former employee's personal identification information, a jury recently ruled.

Test could confirm sepsis within an hour

Nursing home residents might benefit from a new way of diagnosing and treating sepsis made possible by discoveries out of the University of British Columbia.