Salary growth slowed, vacancy rates increased in 2013, assisted living report shows

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Assisted living administrators earned a median salary of $78,000 in 2013, according to the newly released 2013-2104 Assisted Living Salary & Benefits report.

The median administrator salary increased to $92,029 when bonuses were factored in. The figures are based on questionnaire responses from more than 1,800 assisted living facilities nationwide.

Administrators' salaries increased about 2.8% from 2012, according to “same facility” data. That is among the largest increases for the salaried positions analyzed.

CEO/presidents had the highest annual salary ($164,275) but the smallest year-over-year increase (1.52%), according to the same-facility data. Salary growth rates were down from 2011-2012 levels for many positions.

Of staff paid on an hourly basis, resident assistants got the biggest yearly increase, of 2.56%. That took them from earning an average of $11.49 an hour to $11.78.

Annual turnover rates were generally down from last year, but average position vacancy rates were up sharply for many positions. The average vacancy rate for registered nurses went up to nearly 12%, and the rate for certified nursing assistants jumped to 14.5%.

The Hospital & Healthcare Compensation Service published the LeadingAge-endorsed report, with cooperation from the National Center for Assisted Living. For more information, visit www.hhsinc.com.

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