Respite care provides minimal benefits, study finds

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Respite care might not provide a respite after all, a new study from the United Kingdom finds.

Family members and friends who are the main caregivers to elderly loved ones use respite care for support from settings such as nursing homes, hospice and day care. But University of York researchers found that the positive effects of respite on older people and those who care for them are modest.

The review is published in the latest issue of Health Technology Assessment, the international journal series of the Health Technology Assessment programme, part of the National Institute for Health Research in the United Kingdom.
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