Resident care

Virtual reality gets residents excited about exercise: study

Virtual reality gets residents excited about exercise: study

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Nursing home residents probably won't rush to an exercise bike if they know they'll be staring at a blank wall while they work out. But incorporating virtual reality environments with exercise equipment may inspire residents to get active, according to new research out of Denmark.

Training technique halves dementia risk

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A highly specialized brain training technique reduced seniors' dementia risk by nearly 50% over a 10-year period.

VA facilities at least equal to others: study

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The quality of care provided in healthcare facilities managed by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs is comparable to the quality of community-based facilities, according to a recent research review.

Depression therapy may increase fall risk

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Nursing home residents receiving psychosocial treatments for depression have almost six times the risk of falling compared to residents not receiving treatment, according to a new study.

Hospital patients arriving at SNFs with dangerous germs

Hospital patients arriving at SNFs with dangerous germs

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Nearly a quarter of hospital patients entered post-acute care facilities with a multi-drug-resistant organism on their hands, finds a study in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Added therapy hour speeds hip fracture patients home

Added therapy hour speeds hip fracture patients home

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Patients recovering from hip fractures in a skilled nursing facility have a better chance of going home if they get just one hour more of therapy per week, according to a new Ivy League study.

Loneliness cure: involve, don't 'distract'

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A group of international researchers has imagined a new approach to combating loneliness often associated with long-term care settings.

Study: antipsychotics being funneled to aging residents

Study: antipsychotics being funneled to aging residents

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Despite the potential side effects, seniors are more likely to be treated with antipsychotic medications the older they get.

Seniors benefit from taking fewer meds

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Two new studies published in JAMA Internal Medicine suggest doctors should focus on working with some at-risk patients to cut back on medications that treat diabetes and blood pressure.

CDC guide targets antibiotic stewardship

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Skilled nursing facilities need more help from experts and their own staffs to become better stewards of antibiotic use, according to a new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention resource guide.

Drugs used to treat dementia can be deadly, report asserts

Drugs used to treat dementia can be deadly, report asserts

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Several antipsychotics used to control symptoms of dementia increase the risk of patient death more than previously estimated, according to findings published in JAMA Psychiatry.

Minorities: Facilities treat us worse, and life quality suffers

Minorities: Facilities treat us worse, and life quality suffers

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Facility differences in nursing homes impact minority residents' quality of life, research published in the Journal of Aging and Health found.

Seniors delve into online sex communities

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Older adults are using online communities to share sexual experiences more frequently, a study published in the Journal of Leisure Research showed.

A personalized playlist seen as key to longer workouts

A personalized playlist seen as key to longer workouts

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Helping residents make a personalized, tempo-based music playlist may help them better stay on track during cardiac rehabilitation, according to a study published in May's Sports Medicine-Open.

Medical marijuana may not aid dementia

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Behavioral symptoms of dementia, such as agitation, or wandering, may not be helped by medical marijuana pills, research suggests.

Alzheimer's diagnoses not being shared

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Only 45% of people with Alzheimer's disease or their caregivers say they were told the diagnosis by their doctor, according to the 2015 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures report.

Blood pressure drugs linked to mortality

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Too many blood pressure medicines in patients over 80 could be dangerous if they have low systolic pressure, new European research reveals.

Researchers testing C. diff vaccine in widespread trial

Researchers testing C. diff vaccine in widespread trial

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An international trial is examining the efficacy of a vaccine for C. difficile, the gut-destroying bacterium that is particularly dangerous to seniors.

Study reveals slow feedings may exacerbate dysphagia

Study reveals slow feedings may exacerbate dysphagia

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Researchers caution that a slow-but-constant feeding pace could worsen dysphagia by increasing the duration of mealtimes and fatiguing the oral muscles associated with swallowing.

Ask the care expert .. about silverware to help with tremors

Ask the care expert .. about silverware to help with tremors

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Do you know of silverware to assist residents who may have Parkinson's or tremors while eating? We have weighted bulky silverware, but it seems to add to the shaking.

Milk, yogurt best for bone health: study

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Cream is not as effective as milk or yogurt in promoting bone health and combating osteoporosis, according to researchers. Low bone-density puts the elderly at an increased risk for osteoporosis and fractures of the hip, spine and waist. Around one-fourth of those who have a broken hip die within the following year.

Keys to schizophrenic longevity found

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People with schizophrenia are likely to live a longer life if they take antipsychotic drugs on schedule, avoid high doses, and see a mental health professional, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say.

CDC lauds new tracking tool that eyes infection progress

CDC lauds new tracking tool that eyes infection progress

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Government health officials have released a tracking tool that can help nursing homes monitor healthcare-acquired infections.

Implants increase risk of anxiety, trauma

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People who are implanted with cardioverter defibrillators should be carefully monitored and screened for depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder, according to officials with the American Heart Association.

Mild exercise may aid mood for heart-condition patients

Mild exercise may aid mood for heart-condition patients

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New research reveals that moderate exercise can help relieve symptoms in those who have congestive heart failure and subsequent depression.

Mild exercise may aid mood for heart-condition patients

Mild exercise may aid mood for heart-condition patients

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New research reveals that moderate exercise can help relieve symptoms in those who have congestive heart failure and subsequent depression.

Study shows sickest people most dissatisfied with care

Study shows sickest people most dissatisfied with care

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Nursing home residents, who often have at least one or more chronic condition, are among the sickest individuals treated by the American healthcare system. This population's high utilization rates of healthcare services also could result in higher rates of dissatisfaction, a new report suggests.

Study: Single boomers will challenge LTC

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The high number of single baby boomers could put stress on long-term care resources, new research suggests.

Hospitalization harms memory, cognition

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Seniors who have been hospitalized have a higher risk for experiencing a cognitive decline, a new study finds.

Study: Hearing loss could induce falls

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Skilled nursing facility operators eager to reduce resident falls might have a new tool in their kit: testing residents' hearing.

Report: Try both arms when measuring blood pressure

Report: Try both arms when measuring blood pressure

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Taking a resident's blood pressure is such a routine task that most nurses never give the protocol a second thought. New research, however, suggests that it might be time to shake up things.

Study: 'Talking it out' isn't for everyone

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Anxiety and depression are rampant among elderly nursing home residents, but a new study shows that one common treatment may not be as helpful as once thought in this particular population.

Loss of smell hazardous, researchers say

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Age-related changes to sense of smell can put elderly individuals at a higher risk for accidental interactions with dangerous chemicals and poor nutrition, according to a new study.

Reconciliation practices can cut injuries

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There are approximately 800,000 injuries per year in long-term care facilities due to medication reconciliation errors made during transitions of care, according to a new study.

'Sundowning' behaviors are linked to neurological basis

'Sundowning' behaviors are linked to neurological basis

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Scientists have new evidence that "sundowning" — late-day anxiety and agitation behaviors exhibited by older institutionalized adults — has a neurological basis, according to a new study.

Study: Yoga improves fall risk after stroke

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Attending regular yoga classes helps older male veterans who have had a stroke cope with their increased risk of suffering from a painful or deadly fall, according to researchers at Indiana University. The study was funded by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

Antidepressants can boost stroke recovery outcomes

Antidepressants can boost stroke recovery outcomes

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Recovering stroke patients treated with a short course of antidepressants showed greater improvement in physical recovery than stroke patients receiving a placebo, new research finds.

Pressure ulcers have been on the decline, agency reports

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Providers caring for both long- and short-stay nursing home residents saw improvements in rates of pressure sores over most of the last decade, according to a recent report from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The percentage of short-stay nursing home residents with pressure sores fell from 22.6% in 2000 to 18.9% in 2008, according to findings from the AHRQ report.

Music, movement exercises can reduce falls risk: study

Music, movement exercises can reduce falls risk: study

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Seniors at an increased risk for falling who take part in classes involving music and rhythmic exercise may improve their balance and walking skills. As an added benefit, classes could help reduce the number of falls in this group, according to new research out of Switzerland.

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