Researchers pave way for new treatment for serious wounds

Share this article:

A recent breakthrough could lead to more effective treatments for tenacious wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers, according to a report in the journal Nature Chemistry.

Researchers at the University of California-Los Angeles have discovered a way to stabilize one of the body's naturally occurring wound-healing agents, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). bFGF loses much of its effectiveness when outside the body. But by using a polymer that resembles heparin, a complex sugar that bFGF binds to, the UCLA researchers were able to keep bFGF stable in acidic environments resembling those in a wound.

The binding procedure means bFGF could be used to effectively treat even slow-healing wounds such as those in patients with diabetes.

Long-term care providers are eager not only to employ the most effective treatments available but to avoid clinical mishaps related to wound care. Angel McGarrity-Davis, CEO of AMD HealthCare Solution, and Steven Bowman, M.D., the organization's medical director, will speak about avoiding wound care mistakes as part of the seventh annual McKnight's Online Expo. Their webcast at 11 a.m. (EST) on March 21 will be one of five sessions over two days. Expo participants can attend at no cost for continuing education credits. Registration is ongoing at mcknights.com/expo2013.

Share this article:

More in News

Double homicide at Houston nursing home; victims' roommate arrested

Double homicide at Houston nursing home; victims' roommate ...

A double murder occurred late Tuesday night in a Houston nursing home room shared by four men, according to local authorities. Police arrested Guillermo Correa on suspicion of beating two ...

$2 million HIPAA settlement highlights mobile device risks facing healthcare providers

Laptops and other mobile devices containing personal health information have been stolen from long-term care ombudsman programs and other healthcare organizations, including from Concentra Health Services and QCA Health Plan Inc. Now, Concentra and QCA have agreed to legal settlements totaling nearly $2 million, federal ...

Long-term care nurses often 'scramble' to get family members' blessing for palliative ...

Nursing home residents might not transition to full palliative care until they are very near death, at which point nurses and family members act in a state of crisis, suggests recently published research out of Canada.