Researchers pave way for new treatment for serious wounds

Share this article:

A recent breakthrough could lead to more effective treatments for tenacious wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers, according to a report in the journal Nature Chemistry.

Researchers at the University of California-Los Angeles have discovered a way to stabilize one of the body's naturally occurring wound-healing agents, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). bFGF loses much of its effectiveness when outside the body. But by using a polymer that resembles heparin, a complex sugar that bFGF binds to, the UCLA researchers were able to keep bFGF stable in acidic environments resembling those in a wound.

The binding procedure means bFGF could be used to effectively treat even slow-healing wounds such as those in patients with diabetes.

Long-term care providers are eager not only to employ the most effective treatments available but to avoid clinical mishaps related to wound care. Angel McGarrity-Davis, CEO of AMD HealthCare Solution, and Steven Bowman, M.D., the organization's medical director, will speak about avoiding wound care mistakes as part of the seventh annual McKnight's Online Expo. Their webcast at 11 a.m. (EST) on March 21 will be one of five sessions over two days. Expo participants can attend at no cost for continuing education credits. Registration is ongoing at mcknights.com/expo2013.

Share this article:

More in News

'Minor' issues at the nursing home can cause disastrous care transitions, expert warns

'Minor' issues at the nursing home can cause ...

What may appear to be minor administrative problems in a nursing home - a fax machine locked away at night or no one designated to copy paperwork - can cause ...

Long-term care facilities approach 80% worker flu vaccination rate after handing power ...

Fourteen long-term care facilities in Pennsylvania dramatically increased their staff flu vaccination rate by having a regional pharmacy take over the process, according to a report issued Thursday by the Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research (AHQR).

RACs were 'most improved' healthcare auditors for getting back money in 2013, ...

Medicare Recovery Audit Contractors dramatically stepped up their overpayment recoveries last year, returning nearly $487 million more to the government than they did in 2012, according to a new report from a federal watchdog agency.