Researchers make 'stunning' Alzheimer's breakthrough, return affected neurons to normal state

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A major breakthrough in Alzheimer's research could lead to new and more effective ways of treating the disease, according to a recently released study in the Journal of Neuroscience. "This study transforms our understanding of the direct cause of Alzheimer's disease," said principal investigator, Ryohei Yasuda, Ph.D. "With further research, we may open up an entirely new avenue for treatments to combat this disease."

Researchers at the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience may have discovered how the peptide Amyloid beta creates the cognitive dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease. The peptide triggers increased levels of a signaling protein, CentA1, and this protein appears to create the disturbances, the researchers found.

The researchers silenced RNA as a way to reduce the production of CentA1 in rat brain samples. When they did, they discovered affected neurons returned to “normal morphology and synaptic function,” even though Amyloid beta was still present.
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