Researchers: Aspirin less effective in older women than previously thought

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Aspirin apparently does not offer as many therapeutic effects for elderly women as once thought, according to researchers.

One study showed that aspirin taken for coronary disease is four times more likely to be effective in older men than older women. A difference had been noted before but had not been so closely quantified, according to a University of Michigan College of Pharmacy researcher.

"I was surprised by how big of a difference it was for females," said study leader Michael Dorsch. "This is another piece of information that affirms we need more studies in women." It is estimated 20 million people take low doses of aspirin daily to control heart disease.

Meanwhile, other research shows low doses of aspirin does not material slow cognitive losses in older women. Results of a study conducted by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston are posted at www.bmj.com, the Web site of the British Medical Journal.
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