Report: Drugs for dual eligibles cost more under Medicare Part D

Share this article:
Report: Drugs for dual eligibles cost more under Medicare Part D
Report: Drugs for dual eligibles cost more under Medicare Part D
Prescription drugs for Medicare and Medicaid-eligible beneficiaries cost 30% more under Medicare Part D than they would if Medicaid paid the bill, according to a new report from the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform.

The report, which was released Thursday, also found that drug manufacturers received "windfall" revenue of more than $3.7 billion during the first two years of Part D. The Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 required that Medicare Part D, not Medicaid, cover the cost of drugs for dual eligibles. Many nursing-home residents fall into this "dual-eligible" category.

Democrats in the House say this overpayment is an unjustified burden on the taxpayer, and they seek to correct the problem through new legislation. But House Republicans have countered that the new report overlooks important aspects and benefits to dual eligibles contained in the Part D program. Under Part D, for example, dual eligibles have access to a greater variety of prescription drugs.
Share this article:

More in News

'Minor' issues at the nursing home can cause disastrous care transitions, expert warns

'Minor' issues at the nursing home can cause ...

What may appear to be minor administrative problems in a nursing home - a fax machine locked away at night or no one designated to copy paperwork - can cause ...

Long-term care facilities approach 80% worker flu vaccination rate after handing power ...

Fourteen long-term care facilities in Pennsylvania dramatically increased their staff flu vaccination rate by having a regional pharmacy take over the process, according to a report issued Thursday by the Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research (AHQR).

RACs were 'most improved' healthcare auditors for getting back money in 2013, ...

Medicare Recovery Audit Contractors dramatically stepped up their overpayment recoveries last year, returning nearly $487 million more to the government than they did in 2012, according to a new report from a federal watchdog agency.