Quick treatment after transient ischemic attacks could prevent many strokes, researchers document

Share this article:

Seniors who suffer transient ischemic attacks, or mini-strokes, are at greatly heightened risk for experiencing a full-blown stroke soon after and should seek treatment quickly. That's according to recently published research from neurologists at Chicago's Loyola University Medical Center.

TIA symptoms mimic those of full strokes but often go away within an hour. Therefore, victims frequently do not get treatment once the symptoms pass. However, the researchers found that between 10% and 15% of individuals who have TIAs will have a full-blown stroke within three months. Of those, about 40% go on to have a stroke within 24 hours of a TIA's onset, according to the researchers.

Seniors and their caregivers must be especially vigilant for TIAs, because individuals older than 60 are at elevated risk of a subsequent stroke. Diabetes and high blood pressure also increase the chances of a full-blown stroke after a mini-stroke event, according to the report, which appears in the journal Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics

Last week, the American Stroke Association released updated guidelines for stroke response. These guidelines stress rapid treatment with clot-dissolving drugs, if indicated, and highlight the importance of post-acute caregivers being able to recognize and respond to strokes.

Share this article:

More in News

Long-term care continues to lead in deal volume and value: PwC report

Long-term care continues to lead in deal volume ...

Long-term care bucked healthcare industry trends with strong merger and acquisition activity in the second quarter of 2014, according to newly released data from professional services firm PricewaterhouseCoopers.

Empowering nurse practitioners could reduce hospitalizations from SNFs, study finds

Granting more authority to nurse practitioners is associated with reduced hospitalization of skilled nursing facility residents, according to recently published findings.

Pioneer ACO drops out of program, despite reductions in skilled nursing utilization

A California healthcare system has become the latest dropout from the Pioneer Accountable Care Organization program, despite reducing skilled nursing facility utilization and improving its readmission rates. Sharp HealthCare announced its decision in a quarterly financial statement released Tuesday.