Purpose and direction in life could stave off Alzheimer's

Share this article:
People who view life with a sense of purpose and who set goals are less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease or dementia, new research indicates.

To determine sense of purpose, researchers at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, questioned 951 elderly participants on their views of their past and future lives, and whether they felt they had a direction in life. Answers were tabulated and scores were rated on a five-point scale. During the average four-year follow up period, 155 participants developed Alzheimer's. Those who scored in the 90th percentile were 2.4 times less likely to develop Alzheimer's than those in the bottom 10th percentile, according to the report. 

Researchers say the findings could provide new treatment interventions for elderly adults. The report appears in the March issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.


Share this article:

More in News

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in two years: Avalere

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in ...

More than three-quarters of Medicaid beneficiaries will be enrolled in a managed care plan as of 2016, according to an Avalere Health analysis released Thursday. The numbers reveal that managed ...

Nursing home asked for employee's personal information too often, jury rules

The human resources department of a Maine nursing home did not properly protect a former employee's personal identification information, a jury recently ruled.

Test could confirm sepsis within an hour

Nursing home residents might benefit from a new way of diagnosing and treating sepsis made possible by discoveries out of the University of British Columbia.