Prozac could increase the fracture risk in older adults, study says

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Popular medications used to treat depression could raise the risk of bone fractures in older adults, a new study has found.

People aged 50 and older who took antidepressants, including Zoloft, Prozac, and other popular depression medications, faced double the risk of broken bones during five years of follow-up, compared with those who didn't use the drugs, the study said.

Still, few of the more than 5,000 people studied used the drugs and had fractures. While more research is needed to prove the link, the study offers the strongest proof tying these drugs to fracture risks, said Dr. David Goltzman, one of the study authors. The study was part of ongoing osteoporosis research funded partly by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and makers of osteoporosis drugs. The study appears in Monday's Archives of Internal Medicine.
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